Comparison of enamel hypoplasia in the primary and permanent dentition of children from a low fluoride district in Australia

Seow, W. Kim, Ford, Daniel, Kazoullis, Stauros, Newman, Bruce and Holcombe, Trevor (2011) Comparison of enamel hypoplasia in the primary and permanent dentition of children from a low fluoride district in Australia. Pediatric Dentistry, 33 3: 547-551.

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Author Seow, W. Kim
Ford, Daniel
Kazoullis, Stauros
Newman, Bruce
Holcombe, Trevor
Title Comparison of enamel hypoplasia in the primary and permanent dentition of children from a low fluoride district in Australia
Journal name Pediatric Dentistry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0164-1263
Publication date 2011-05
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 33
Issue 3
Start page 547
End page 551
Total pages 5
Place of publication United States
Publisher American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Purpose:
The purpose of this study was to compare developmental defects of enamel (DDE) in the primary and permanent dentitions of children from a low-fluoride district.

Methods:
A total of 517 healthy schoolchildren were examined using the modified DDE criteria.

Results:

The prevalence of DDE in the primary and permanent dentition was 25% and 58%, respectively (P<.001). The mean number of teeth with enamel opacity per subject was approximately threefold compared to that affected by enamel hypoplasia (3.1±3.8 vs 0.8±1.4, P<.001 in the primary dentition and 3.6±4.7 vs 1.2±2.2, P<.001 in the permanent dentition). Demarcated opacities (83%) were predominant compared to diffuse opacities (17%), while missing enamel was the most common type of enamel hypoplasia (50%), followed by grooves (31%) and enamel pits (19%) (P=.04). In the permanent dentition, diffuse and demarcated opacities were equally frequent, while enamel grooves were the commonest type of hypoplasia (52%), followed by missing enamel (35%) and enamel pits (5%; P<.001).

Conclusions:
In a low-fluoride community, developmental defects of enamel were twice as common in the permanent dentition vs the primary dentition. In the primary dentition, the predominant defects were demarcated opacities and missing enamel, while in the permanent dentition, the defects were more variable.
Keyword De Marcated opacity
Diffuse opacity
Enamel hypoplasia
Enamel opacity
Fluorosis
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Dentistry Publications
 
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Created: Sat, 15 Oct 2011, 21:01:35 EST by Professor W. Kim Seow on behalf of School of Dentistry