Assessment of ozone impacts on vegetation in southern Africa and directions for future research: Commentary

Van Tienhoven, Anna Mieke, Otter, Luanne, Lenkopane, Mothei, Venjonoka, Kuvare and Zunckel, Mark (2005) Assessment of ozone impacts on vegetation in southern Africa and directions for future research: Commentary. South African Journal of Science, 101 3-4: 143-148.

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Author Van Tienhoven, Anna Mieke
Otter, Luanne
Lenkopane, Mothei
Venjonoka, Kuvare
Zunckel, Mark
Title Assessment of ozone impacts on vegetation in southern Africa and directions for future research: Commentary
Journal name South African Journal of Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0038-2353
1996-7489
Publication date 2005-03-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 101
Issue 3-4
Start page 143
End page 148
Total pages 6
Place of publication Tygervalley, South Africa
Publisher AOSIS
Language eng
Abstract Levels of background ozone in southern Africa are high enough to cause concern, as they frequently exceed the 40 ppb threshold currently adopted by the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe. They also surpass the exposure index of 3000 ppb.h, which is intended to protect crops and natural vegetation in Europe. Natural vegetation and crops in southern Africa may be tolerant of elevated ozone concentrations because of naturally high background levels, but additional anthropogenic inputs of ozone precursors may result in exceedances of ozone damage thresholds that affect vegetation. Current impact assessment policies in Europe are shifting from an exposure approach to one based on flux. If existing European methods are to be applied in southern Africa, the flux model would be the more appropriate of the two to assess likely impacts. Besides data requirements for flux modelling, the method would need to accommodate extended growing periods, locally appropriate crops such as maize, and the frequency and extent of drought periods. In southern Africa, crop production may be more greatly affected by drought, floods, and agronomic inputs but the possible deleterious effects of elevated ozone are sufficient to merit further investigation.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Civil Engineering Publications
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Created: Sat, 15 Oct 2011, 00:46:48 EST by Mr Mothei Lenkopane on behalf of School of Civil Engineering