Contingent, contested and changing: de-constructing Indigenous knowledge in a science curriculum resource from the south coast of New South Wales

Nash, Daphne (2009). Contingent, contested and changing: de-constructing Indigenous knowledge in a science curriculum resource from the south coast of New South Wales. In: Jackie Huggins and Elizabeth Mackinlay, Special Supplementary Issue for the annual Indigenous Studies and Indigenous Knowledge Conference. Annual Indigenous Studies and Indigenous Knowledge Conference, Hobart, Australia, (25-33). 2-4 July 2008.

Author Nash, Daphne
Title of paper Contingent, contested and changing: de-constructing Indigenous knowledge in a science curriculum resource from the south coast of New South Wales
Conference name Annual Indigenous Studies and Indigenous Knowledge Conference
Conference location Hobart, Australia
Conference dates 2-4 July 2008
Proceedings title Special Supplementary Issue for the annual Indigenous Studies and Indigenous Knowledge Conference   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name The Australian Journal of Indigenous Education   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Bowen Hills, QLD, Australia
Publisher Australian Academic Press
Publication Year 2009
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status
ISSN 1326-0111
2049-7784
Editor Jackie Huggins
Elizabeth Mackinlay
Volume 38
Issue Supplementary
Start page 25
End page 33
Total pages 9
Language eng
Abstract/Summary The nature and status of Indigenous knowledge is often debated, but the idea that Indigenous people's knowledge is local knowledge seems widely accepted: knowledge is place-based and may reference a range of places, from traditional land to other places known from social and cultural connections. Through collaboration with Koori people from the south coast of New South Wales to develop a web-based science resource, other distinctive characteristics of their knowledge emerged. This paper explores some transformations in contemporary Indigenous knowledge, while acknowledging the history of colonisation in south eastern Australia. A focus on two examples of Koori art demonstrates that Indigenous knowledge is contingent, contested and changing in culturally defined ways. These aspects are often overlooked in educational practice that essentialises Indigeneity and Indigenous people's knowledge.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

 
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Created: Fri, 14 Oct 2011, 14:15:14 EST by Dr Daphne Nash on behalf of School of Architecture