From shell work to shell art: Koori women creating knowledge and value on the South Coast of NSW

Nash, Daphne (2010) From shell work to shell art: Koori women creating knowledge and value on the South Coast of NSW. craft + design enquiry, 2 .

Author Nash, Daphne
Title From shell work to shell art: Koori women creating knowledge and value on the South Coast of NSW
Journal name craft + design enquiry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1837-445X
Publication date 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status
Volume 2
Total pages 37
Place of publication Barton, A.C.T., Australia
Publisher Craft Australia, Craft Australia Research Centre
Language eng
Formatted abstract
For many years the shell art of Aboriginal women on the South Coast of New South Wales has been an icon of Aboriginal people’s survival in that region. It is on the record since the 1880s that Koori women have made shell work objects to sell to tourists. This practice is undergoing a revival, and recognition of shell art is increasing particularly through the making of Sydney Harbour Bridges and miniature shoes. As the art work of Indigenous people, shell art is increasingly entering into the art market. When its cultural connections are understood, shell art is no longer dismissed as “tourist art”. What forces are operating and how does shell art mean?

This paper explores the processes of cultural revitalisation and value creation, testing the categorisation of shell art as either Aboriginal or Western, traditional or contemporary, art or craft. In many ways these binaries are not sustainable as contemporary Koori artists connect with their cultural heritage in new ways. It examines the explicit and implicit knowledge contained in the shelled objects, emphasising the complexity of contemporary cross‐cultural exchanges and their influences on modes of knowledge production. The value of shell art is transforming through the engagement of Kooris with the art market and other cultural institutions. Moreover, Koori women are finding agency in this continuing cultural practice.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Aboriginal Environments Research Centre Publications
ERA 2012 Admin Only
School of Architecture Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 14 Oct 2011, 14:11:11 EST by Dr Daphne Nash on behalf of School of Architecture