Using computational fluid dynamics to study the effect of contact angle on microdroplet deformation

Rosengarten, G., Harvie, D. and Cooper-White, J. (2004). Using computational fluid dynamics to study the effect of contact angle on microdroplet deformation. In: Proceedings: Computational Techniques and Applications Conference. 12th Biennial Computational Techniques and Applications Conference (CTAC 2004), Melbourne, Australia, (C304-C319). 27 September - 1 October 2004. doi:10.0000/anziamj.v46i0.961

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
UQ255947_OA.pdf Full text (open access) application/pdf 397.03KB 0

Author Rosengarten, G.
Harvie, D.
Cooper-White, J.
Title of paper Using computational fluid dynamics to study the effect of contact angle on microdroplet deformation
Conference name 12th Biennial Computational Techniques and Applications Conference (CTAC 2004)
Conference location Melbourne, Australia
Conference dates 27 September - 1 October 2004
Proceedings title Proceedings: Computational Techniques and Applications Conference   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name ANZIAM Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Publication Year 2004
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.0000/anziamj.v46i0.961
Open Access Status DOI
ISSN 1446-1811
1446-8735
Volume 46
Issue 5
Start page C304
End page C319
Total pages 16
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Computational fluid dynamics (?) is used to study the effect of contact angle on droplet shape as it moves through a contraction. A new non-dimensional number is proposed in order to predict situations where the deformed droplet will form a slug in the contraction and thus interact with the channel wall. We argue that droplet flow into a contraction is a useful method to ensure that a droplet will wet a channel surface without a trapped lubrication film. We demonstrate that when a droplet is larger than a contraction, capillary and Reynolds numbers, and fluid properties may not be sufficient to fully describe the droplet dynamics through a contraction. We show that with everything else constant droplet shape and breakup can be controlled simply by changing the wetting properties of the channel wall. ? simulations with contact angles ranging from 30 ? to 150 ? shows that lower contact angles can induce droplet breakup while higher contact angles form contact-angle dependent shape slugs.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 22 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Fri, 14 Oct 2011, 09:06:19 EST by Justin Cooper-White on behalf of Faculty Of Engineering, Architecture & Info Tech