Temperature explains settlement patterns of the introduced bryozoan Membranipora membranacea in Nova Scotia, Canada

Saunders, Megan and Metaxas, Anna (2007) Temperature explains settlement patterns of the introduced bryozoan Membranipora membranacea in Nova Scotia, Canada. Marine Ecology-Progress Series, 344 95-106. doi:10.3354/meps06924


Author Saunders, Megan
Metaxas, Anna
Title Temperature explains settlement patterns of the introduced bryozoan Membranipora membranacea in Nova Scotia, Canada
Journal name Marine Ecology-Progress Series   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0171-8630; 616-1599
Publication date 2007
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3354/meps06924
Volume 344
Start page 95
End page 106
Total pages 12
Place of publication Oldendorf, Germany
Publisher Inter-Research
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Settlement is a critical life-history stage for benthic invertebrates with a planktonic larval form, and is important for understanding mechanisms of larval supply and population dynamics. We examined spatial (metre to kilometre scales) and temporal (weekly to yearly scales) patterns in abundance of settlers of the introduced bryozoan Membranipora membranacea on the numerically dominant kelp Saccharina longicruris, at 2 sites in St. Margarets Bay, Nova Scotia, Canada. Relationships between patterns in settlement and indices of the temperature regime, such as average weekly temperature, temperature fluctuations, water column stratification and thermal history (growing degree-day) were determined using multiple linear regressions. Although settler abundance varied interannually, it was highest in early autumn, and was generally higher at depth (12 and 8 m) than in the shallows (4 m). Abundance was an order of magnitude greater after a significantly warmer winter. Growing degree-day accounted for up to 81 % of the variability in settler abundance, whereas average temperature, temperature fluctuations and stratification were less important. The strong positive relationship between thermal history and settlement of this ecologically important species suggests that abundance of established introduced marine species may increase with the increased temperatures predicted to result from climate change. © Inter-Research 2007.
Keyword Larval Settlement
Temperature
Thermal History
Stratification
Bathymetric patterns
Benthic invertebrates
Introduced species
Climate change
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Global Change Institute Publications
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