Fecal NIRS calibration for predicting protein and digestibility in the diet of cattle: fistulate and pen feeding procedures for generating diet-faecal pairs

Coates, D. B. and Dixon, R. M. (2010). Fecal NIRS calibration for predicting protein and digestibility in the diet of cattle: fistulate and pen feeding procedures for generating diet-faecal pairs. In: John Walker and Doug Tolleson, Shining Light on Manure Improves Livestock and Land Management. Shining Light on Manure Improves Livestock and Land Management, Reno, NV, United States, (23-41). 9-16 February 2007.

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Author Coates, D. B.
Dixon, R. M.
Title of paper Fecal NIRS calibration for predicting protein and digestibility in the diet of cattle: fistulate and pen feeding procedures for generating diet-faecal pairs
Conference name Shining Light on Manure Improves Livestock and Land Management
Conference location Reno, NV, United States
Conference dates 9-16 February 2007
Proceedings title Shining Light on Manure Improves Livestock and Land Management
Place of Publication College Station, TX, United States
Publisher Texas AgriLife Research and Society for Range Management
Publication Year 2010
Sub-type Fully published paper
Editor John Walker
Doug Tolleson
Start page 23
End page 41
Total pages 19
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Use of fecal Near Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy (F.NIRS) for measuring dietary attributes such as crude protein concentration and DM (dry matter) digestibility differs from most NIRS applications in several respects. Importantly, in developing calibration equations, constituent reference values and spectra are measured on different substrates: constituent values are determined by analyzing diet samples using appropriate laboratory techniques while the NIR spectra are obtained by scanning fecal samples from animals consuming the same diets. Thus the term “diet-fecal pairs” is often used to describe these samples for developing calibration equations, which are defined as derivative calibrations in Chapter 1. Obviously an important characteristic of diet-fecal pairs is that the sample analyzed for diet reference values must be truly representative of the diet consumed and the sampled feces also must be properly matched with that same diet. A second unusual aspect of F.NIRS technology is that the dietary material of interest is modified by digestion in the gastrointestinal tract before the spectra are measured. Therefore, there is an implicit assumption that there are stable and close correlations between the spectral absorbances of feces at certain wavelengths and the dietary attributes of interest. It appears that deviations from such correlations between diet and fecal components introduce errors with some types of diets. In this paper we discuss the development of F.NIRS technology for cattle production in the extensive grazing systems of northern Australia. We focus on the techniques and methods used for obtaining diet-fecal pairs that meet the requirements of robust calibration equations.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
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Created: Wed, 12 Oct 2011, 13:52:04 EST by Dr Robert Dixon on behalf of School of Agriculture and Food Sciences