Entrepreneurship education: How socially focused should we be?

Maluwetig, Michelle and Verreynne, Martie-Louise (2011). Entrepreneurship education: How socially focused should we be?. In: Alex Maritz, Regional Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research 2011: Proceedings of the 8th AGSE International Entrepreneurship Research Exchange. 8th AGSE International Entrepreneurship Research Exchange, Melbourne, Australia, (1427-1441). 1-4 February 2011.

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Author Maluwetig, Michelle
Verreynne, Martie-Louise
Title of paper Entrepreneurship education: How socially focused should we be?
Conference name 8th AGSE International Entrepreneurship Research Exchange
Conference location Melbourne, Australia
Conference dates 1-4 February 2011
Proceedings title Regional Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research 2011: Proceedings of the 8th AGSE International Entrepreneurship Research Exchange
Place of Publication Melbourne, Australia
Publisher Swinburne University of Technology
Publication Year 2011
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status
ISBN 9780980332872
Editor Alex Maritz
Start page 1427
End page 1441
Total pages 15
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Even before the financial crisis, the business academia and mainstream media have called into question the relevance of a business education. The business community is facing declining trust, and employers and consumers alike are demanding a new breed of leaders and innovators. This paper presents empirical evidence that firstly, social dimensions are dominant themes in business education among high-performing universities and secondly, that this integration is statistically associated with gains in reputation and higher incomes for students after graduation. Leading universities are already accruing social and economic value by staying abreast of social innovation. These developments also have the opportunity to improve the outcomes for the broader university sector.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
UQ Business School Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 10 Oct 2011, 10:58:15 EST by Karen Morgan on behalf of UQ Business School