Cecal and colonic responses in rats fed 5 or 30% corn oil diets containing either 7.5% broccoli dietary fiber or microcrystalline cellulose

Paturi, Gunaranjan, Butts, Christine, Monro, John, Nones, Katia, Martell, Sheridan, Butler, Ruth and Sutherland, Juliet (2010) Cecal and colonic responses in rats fed 5 or 30% corn oil diets containing either 7.5% broccoli dietary fiber or microcrystalline cellulose. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 58 10: 6510-6515. doi:10.1021/jf100296m


Author Paturi, Gunaranjan
Butts, Christine
Monro, John
Nones, Katia
Martell, Sheridan
Butler, Ruth
Sutherland, Juliet
Title Cecal and colonic responses in rats fed 5 or 30% corn oil diets containing either 7.5% broccoli dietary fiber or microcrystalline cellulose
Journal name Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0021-8561
1520-5118
Publication date 2010-05-26
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1021/jf100296m
Volume 58
Issue 10
Start page 6510
End page 6515
Total pages 6
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher American Chemical Society
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Growing evidence suggests that microbiota in the human gastrointestinal tract play a crucial role in mediating the effects of foods on colonic health and host metabolism. The large bowel ecosystem is known to be perturbed in humans and animals fed high-fat diets and conversely to be protected by fermentable oligosaccharides. We examined the ability of largely fermentable dietary fiber from broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica) and minimally fermented microcrystalline cellulose to buffer against the effects of high-fat intakes. The results showed that high fat lowered food intakes and therefore fiber intake by 27%. The addition of fermentable oligosaccharide to the diet was shown to be beneficial to some microbiota in cecum, altered cecal short-chain fatty acids, and increased the colon crypt depth and the number of goblet cells per crypt in high- and low-fat diets. Although, the fat level was the predominant factor in changes to the large bowel ecosystem, we have shown that broccoli fiber conferred some protection to consumption of a high-fat diet and particularly in terms of colon morphology.
Keyword Brassicaceae
Carboxylic acids
Goblet cells
High-fat diet
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Institute for Molecular Bioscience - Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 03 Oct 2011, 17:39:50 EST by Dr Katia Nones on behalf of Institute for Molecular Bioscience