Cost-effectiveness of influenza vaccination of people aged 50-64 years in Australia: results are inconclusive

Mogasale, Vittal and Barendregt, Jan (2011) Cost-effectiveness of influenza vaccination of people aged 50-64 years in Australia: results are inconclusive. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 35 2: 180-186. doi:10.1111/j.1753-6405.2010.00639.x


Author Mogasale, Vittal
Barendregt, Jan
Title Cost-effectiveness of influenza vaccination of people aged 50-64 years in Australia: results are inconclusive
Journal name Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1326-0200
1753-6405
Publication date 2011-04
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2010.00639.x
Volume 35
Issue 2
Start page 180
End page 186
Total pages 7
Place of publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: Influenza cost-effectiveness studies use models for influenza clinical evolution based on a range of assumptions. We explore the importance of these assumptions and its implications in policy decisions.

Methods:
An influenza model was constructed to measure the costeffectiveness of universal influenza vaccination of people over 50 years compared to current policy to vaccinate people over 65 years in Australia using available epidemiological data. We explored two scenarios, one with an Australian estimate of influenza like illness incidence, and one with a European estimate. Further, we estimated uncertainty of model structure and various parameter assumptions, and compared with a previous study.

Results: The scenario and sensitivity analysis has shown the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of the proposed compared to current policy varies from $112,000 to $6,000 per DALY. The model structure, parameter assumptions and limitations of existing epidemiological data lead to extensive unaccounted uncertainties in previous studies.

Conclusion: The lack of influenza epidemiological data makes the influenza cost-effectiveness studies that compare the universal influenza vaccinations of people over 50 years to current policy unreliable.

Implications: It is imperative to appraise unreliability of influenza cost-effectiveness studies in policy decisions. Research to acquire more data on influenza uncertainties in Australia should be funded.
Keyword Influenza vaccination
cost-effectiveness
economic evaluation
Respiratory Syncytial Virus
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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