Metabolic engineering of hyaluronic acid production in streptococci

Nielsen, Lars K., Marcellin, Esteban and Chen, Wendy (2009). Metabolic engineering of hyaluronic acid production in streptococci. In: SIM Annual Meeting and Exhibition 2009: Industrial microbiology and biotechnology: Invited oral papers. SIM Annual Meeting and Exhibition 2009, Toronto, Canada, (1-8). 26-30 July 2009.

Author Nielsen, Lars K.
Marcellin, Esteban
Chen, Wendy
Title of paper Metabolic engineering of hyaluronic acid production in streptococci
Conference name SIM Annual Meeting and Exhibition 2009
Conference location Toronto, Canada
Conference dates 26-30 July 2009
Proceedings title SIM Annual Meeting and Exhibition 2009: Industrial microbiology and biotechnology: Invited oral papers   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Fairfax, VA, United States
Publisher Society for Industrial Microbiology (SIM)
Publication Year 2009
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISSN 1234-5678
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a ubiquitous polysaccharide of vertebrates with a USD 2 billion plus pharmaceutical and cosmetic market. Reticence to the use of animal derived HA has revitalized the market for HA produced by fermentation of group C streptococci. The molecular weight realized in microbial culture, however, is much less than this maximum and – significantly – much less than the molecular weight that can be realized through extraction from rooster comb. The molecular weight realized in streptococcal cultures is greatly affected by culture parameters such as sugar source and oxygen availability indicating that resource availability (energy and carbon) is a major factor. Over the past decade, we have explored with limited success various process and strain engineering strategies to release more resources for HA production. Through systematic overexpression of each gene in the HA pathway and comprehensive omics analysis of the resultant strains, we have now successfully broken the 5 MDa barrier, up from 1-2 MDa for wildtype strains. The study highlights the power of systems biotechnology to tackle quality traits such as molecular weight. The key to the success in this case was to achieve a proper balance between the two activated HA precursors, UDP-N-acetyl glucosamine and UDP-glucuronic acid. Presumably, HAS terminates polymerization if a precursor enters the enzyme out of turn. Through the understanding gained through the systems approach, it was possible to identify a number of strain and bioprocess engineering strategies that led to high Mw.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 28 Sep 2011, 02:57:37 EST by Mr Esteban Marcellin Saldana on behalf of Aust Institute for Bioengineering & Nanotechnology