Arabidopsis and Lobelia anceps access small peptides as a nitrogen source for growth

Soper, Fiona M., Paungfoo-Lonhienne, Chanyarat, Brackin, Richard, Rentsch, Doris, Schmidt, Susanne and Robinson, Nicole (2011) Arabidopsis and Lobelia anceps access small peptides as a nitrogen source for growth. Functional Plant Biology, 38 10: 788-796. doi:10.1071/FP11077


Author Soper, Fiona M.
Paungfoo-Lonhienne, Chanyarat
Brackin, Richard
Rentsch, Doris
Schmidt, Susanne
Robinson, Nicole
Title Arabidopsis and Lobelia anceps access small peptides as a nitrogen source for growth
Formatted title
Arabidopsis and Lobelia anceps access small peptides as a nitrogen source for growth
Journal name Functional Plant Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1445-4408
1445-4416
Publication date 2011-09
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/FP11077
Volume 38
Issue 10
Start page 788
End page 796
Total pages 9
Place of publication Collingwood, VIC, Australia
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
While importance of amino acids as a nitrogen source for plants is increasingly recognised, other organic N sources including small peptides have received less attention. We assessed the capacity of functionally different species, annual and nonmycorrhizal Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. (Brassicaceae) and perennial Lobelia anceps L.f. (Campanulaceae), to acquire, metabolise and use small peptides as a N source independent of symbionts. Plants were grown axenically on media supplemented with small peptides (2–4 amino acids), amino acids or inorganic N. In A. thaliana, peptides of up to four amino acid residues sustained growth and supported up to 74% of the maximum biomass accumulation achieved with inorganic N. Peptides also supported growth of L. anceps, but to a lesser extent. Using metabolite analysis, a proportion of the peptides supplied in the medium were detected intact in root and shoot tissue together with their metabolic products. Nitrogen source preferences, growth responses and shoot–root biomass allocation were species-specific and suggest caution in the use of Arabidopsis as the sole plant model. In particular, glycine peptides of increasing length induced effects ranging from complete inhibition to marked stimulation of root growth. This study contributes to emerging evidence that plants can acquire and metabolise organic N beyond amino acids.
Keyword Amino acids
Organic nitrogen
Plant nutrition
Free amino acids
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
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