The right to protest in Australian political culture

Gelber, Katharine (2009). The right to protest in Australian political culture. In: APSA Conference 2009. APSA Conference 2009: Australian Political Studies Association Annual Conference, North Ryde, NSW, Australia, (1-17). 27-30 September 2009.

Author Gelber, Katharine
Title of paper The right to protest in Australian political culture
Conference name APSA Conference 2009: Australian Political Studies Association Annual Conference
Conference location North Ryde, NSW, Australia
Conference dates 27-30 September 2009
Convener Australian Political Studies Association
Proceedings title APSA Conference 2009   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Sydney, NSW, Australia
Publisher Discipline of Politics and International Relations, Department of Modern History, Politics, International Relations and Security, Macquarie University
Publication Year 2009
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISSN 1234-5678
Start page 1
End page 17
Total pages 17
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
The right to protest and demonstrate, and the right to peaceful assembly, are widely considered fundamental to democratic practice and the epitome of collective, extra-institutional political expression in a democratic polity. Peaceful protest is central both to collective processes of democratic legitimation and to the speech by and through which individuals participate in the legitimation of democratic society. In this paper I will investigate the place of the right to protest in Australian political culture. I will analyse the cultural, normative regulation of protest as a form of political expression.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown
Additional Notes Authors prepress title: "The right to protest and Australian political culture".

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Political Science and International Studies Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 22 Sep 2011, 10:35:13 EST by Dr Katharine Gelber on behalf of School of Political Science & Internat'l Studies