Are word representations abstract or instance-based? Effects of spelling inconsistency in orthographic learning

Burt, Jennifer S. and Long, Julia (2011) Are word representations abstract or instance-based? Effects of spelling inconsistency in orthographic learning. Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology, 65 3: 214-228. doi:10.1037/a0023708

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Author Burt, Jennifer S.
Long, Julia
Title Are word representations abstract or instance-based? Effects of spelling inconsistency in orthographic learning
Journal name Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1196-1961
Publication date 2011-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1037/a0023708
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 65
Issue 3
Start page 214
End page 228
Total pages 15
Place of publication Canada
Publisher Canadian Psychological Association
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Abstract In Experiment 1, 62 10-year-old children studied printed pseudowords with semantic information. The items were later represented in a different format for reading, with half of the items spelled in the same way as before and half displayed in a new phonologically equivalent spelling. In a dictation test, the exposure to an alternative spelling substantially increased the number of errors that matched the alternative spelling, especially in good spellers. Orthographic learning predicted word identification when accuracy on orthographic choice for words was controlled. In Experiment 2, the effects on dictation responses of exposure to a misspelling versus the correct spelling, and the interactive effect of spelling ability, were confirmed relative to a no-exposure control in adults. The results support a single-lexicon view of reading and spelling and have implications for abstractionist and instance-based theories of orthographic representations.
Keyword Orthographic learning
Spelling
Abstract lexical representations
Episodic
Instance-based representations
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 4 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 5 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Tue, 20 Sep 2011, 23:28:29 EST by Dr Jennifer Burt on behalf of School of Psychology