The effects of arousal and valence on facial electromyographic asymmetry during blocked picture viewing

Zhang, Jing, Lipp, Ottmar V., Oei, Tian P. S. and Zhou, Renlai (2011) The effects of arousal and valence on facial electromyographic asymmetry during blocked picture viewing. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 79 3: 378-384. doi:10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2010.12.005


Author Zhang, Jing
Lipp, Ottmar V.
Oei, Tian P. S.
Zhou, Renlai
Title The effects of arousal and valence on facial electromyographic asymmetry during blocked picture viewing
Journal name International Journal of Psychophysiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0167-8760
1872-7697
Publication date 2011-03
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2010.12.005
Volume 79
Issue 3
Start page 378
End page 384
Total pages 7
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier BV
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The effect of stimulus valence and arousal on facial electromyographic (EMG) asymmetry was investigated to inform the debate about two contrasting hypotheses of emotion: the right hemisphere dominance hypothesis and the valence hypothesis. EMG was recorded from the left and right corrugator and zygomaticus muscles while participants (N = 21) viewed blocks of negative and positive pictures that were high or low in arousal. Ratings of valence and arousal were taken before and after each of the four emotion blocks. Corrugator muscle activity yielded evidence for left hemi-face dominance during high and low arousal negative picture blocks whereas zygomaticus muscle activity yielded evidence for right hemi-face dominance during high arousal positive picture blocks, especially early during the picture sequence. This pattern of results is consistent with the valence hypothesis.

Research highlights: ►Left hemi-face dominance for corrugator activity during high and low arousal negative emotion blocks. ►Right hemi-face dominance for zygomaticus activity during the high arousal positive emotion blocks. ►The results provided some support for the valence hypothesis. ►The emotion stimulus arousal qualified facial EMG asymmetry in response to positive emotional stimuli whereas no such effect was evident for facial EMG asymmetry in response to negative emotional stimuli.
Keyword Emotional arousal
Valence
Facial asymmetry
EMG
Heart-rate
Emotional expression
Negative emotions
Sex-differences
EMG asymmetry
Brain-damage
Responses
Photographs
Perception
Activation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 20 Sep 2011, 12:01:14 EST by Ottmar Lipp on behalf of School of Psychology