Long term care facilities as discursive environments: Implications for end of life care

Parker, Deborah (2009). Long term care facilities as discursive environments: Implications for end of life care. In: 11th Congress of the European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC): Abstracts. EAPC2009: 11th Congress of the European Association for Palliative Care, Vienna, Austria, (29-29). 7-10 May 2009.

Author Parker, Deborah
Title of paper Long term care facilities as discursive environments: Implications for end of life care
Conference name EAPC2009: 11th Congress of the European Association for Palliative Care
Conference location Vienna, Austria
Conference dates 7-10 May 2009
Convener European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC)
Proceedings title 11th Congress of the European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC): Abstracts   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name European Journal of Palliative Care   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Covent Garden, London, U.K.
Publisher Hayward Medical Communications,
Publication Year 2009
Sub-type Published abstract
ISSN 1352-2779
1479-0793
Volume 16
Issue Supp.
Start page 29
End page 29
Total pages 1
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
This presentation provides an overview of an ethnographic study informed by the symbolic interactionism perspective (Parker, 2008) to explore the social experience of death and dying in Australian residential aged care facilities. Drawing on the work of Gubrium & Holstein (2000,2001) the concepts of discursive environments and institutional identities are used to illuminate the mediating role of institutions, such as residential aged care facilities, in the construction of the self in society. With respect to dying and death in these settings the study provides evidence of how Australian residential aged care facilities as discursive environments provide institutional templates for the construction of self identity for dying residents. The discursive environments of the two residential aged care facilities embraced the revivalist discourse of a palliative approach for dying residents. This revivalist discourse was evidenced by discursive practices within the environments that acknowledged death and dying and embraced self identity, values, biography and relationships between dying residents, their family and staff. However, this revivalist discourse was overshadowed by the biomedical and economic discourses which were dominant in these settings and which dictated the possible institutional templates that were available for dying residents to construct their identity. Four possible templates for self construction for dying residents were proposed. These were the economic self reflecting the presence of an economic discourse, the embodied and dying selves which were created to serve the economical and biomedical discourses and the other constructed self for those whose resources of identity construction are limited.
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Presented during Parallel Symposium PS 08: "Palliative Care in Older People - End of Life Care in Long-Term Care Facilities" as Presentation #1365, Oral Presentation PS 08.1. Authors prepresentation title: "A contested state in a contested place: Understanding living and dying in long-term care settings for older people".

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 13 Sep 2011, 14:39:02 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work