Solving the Wolbachia Paradox: Modeling the Tripartite Interaction between Host, Wolbachia, and a Natural Enemy

Fenton, Andrew, Johnson, Karyn N., Brownlie, Jeremy C. and Hurst, Gregory D. D. (2011) Solving the Wolbachia Paradox: Modeling the Tripartite Interaction between Host, Wolbachia, and a Natural Enemy. American Naturalist, 178 3: 333-342. doi:10.1086/661247

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Author Fenton, Andrew
Johnson, Karyn N.
Brownlie, Jeremy C.
Hurst, Gregory D. D.
Title Solving the Wolbachia Paradox: Modeling the Tripartite Interaction between Host, Wolbachia, and a Natural Enemy
Journal name American Naturalist   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0003-0147
1537-5323
Publication date 2011-09
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1086/661247
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 178
Issue 3
Start page 333
End page 342
Total pages 10
Place of publication Chicago, IL, United States
Publisher University of Chicago Press
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Wolbachia is one of the most common symbionts of arthropods. Its establishment requires lateral transfer to and successful transmission within novel host species. However, Wolbachia performs poorly when introduced into new host species, and models predict that Wolbachia should seldom be able to establish from low initial frequencies. Recently, various symbionts, includingWolbachia, have been shown to protect their hosts from natural enemies. Hence, Wolbachia invasion may be facilitated by the dynamic interaction between it, its host, and a natural enemy. We model such an interaction whereby Wolbachia induces either complete resistance, partial resistance, or tolerance to a host-specific pathogen and also induces the common manipulation phenotype of cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI). We show that the presence of the pathogen greatly facilitates Wolbachia invasion from rare and widens the parameter space in which "imperfect" Wolbachia strains can invade. Furthermore, positive frequency-dependent selection through CI can drive Wolbachia to very high frequencies, potentially excluding the pathogen. These results may explain a poorly understood aspect ofWolbachia biology: it is widespread, despite performing poorly after transfer to new host species. They also support the intriguing possibility that Wolbachia strains that encode both CI and natural-enemy resistance could potentially rid insects, including human disease vectors, of important pathogens
Keyword Resistance
Tolerance
Symbiont
Coinfection
Naturalenemy protection
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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