Validity and reliability of a simple ultrasound approach to measure medial gastrocnemius muscle length

Barber, Lee, Barrett, Rod and Lichtwark, Glen (2011) Validity and reliability of a simple ultrasound approach to measure medial gastrocnemius muscle length. Journal of Anatomy, 218 6: 637-642. doi:10.1111/j.1469-7580.2011.01365.x


Author Barber, Lee
Barrett, Rod
Lichtwark, Glen
Title Validity and reliability of a simple ultrasound approach to measure medial gastrocnemius muscle length
Journal name Journal of Anatomy   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0021-8782
1469-7580
Publication date 2011-06
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1469-7580.2011.01365.x
Volume 218
Issue 6
Start page 637
End page 642
Total pages 6
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Abstract Fixed shortening of a muscle, or contracture, often develops in individuals with an upper motor neuron disorder. A clinical measure of muscle length would therefore be useful for identifying the presence of muscle contracture, tracking changes over time and evaluating the effect of interventions. This study compared a novel ultrasound-tape length method with a previously validated freehand 3D ultrasound method for measuring muscle length. The ultrasound-tape method intra-session reliability was also assessed. Resting medial gastrocnemius muscle length was measured at three ankle joint angles in 15 typically developed (TD) adults and nine adults with cerebral palsy (CP) using the two methods. The ultrasound-tape method on average overestimated the muscle length in the TD group by < 0.1% (95% CI, 6%) and underestimated in the muscle length in the CP group by 0.1% (95% CI, 6%) compared with the 3D ultrasound method. Intra-session reliability of the ultrasound- tape method was high, with intra-class correlation coefficients > 0.99. The ultrasound-tape method has sufficient accuracy to detect clinically relevant differences and changes in medial gastrocnemius muscle length and may therefore be a useful clinical tool for assessing muscle length changes associated with contracture.
Keyword Acquired brain injury
Cerebral palsy
Muscle contracture
Muscle length
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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