High intake of folate from food sources is associated with reduced risk of esophageal cancer in an Australian population

Ibiebele, Torukiri I., Hughes, Maria Celia, Pandeya, Nirmala, Zhao, Zhen, Montgomery, Grant, Hayward, Nick, Green, Adele C., Whiteman, David C., Webb, Penelope M. and for the Study of Digestive Health and Australian Cancer Study (2011) High intake of folate from food sources is associated with reduced risk of esophageal cancer in an Australian population. Journal of Nutrition, 141 2: 274-283. doi:10.3945/jn.110.131235


Author Ibiebele, Torukiri I.
Hughes, Maria Celia
Pandeya, Nirmala
Zhao, Zhen
Montgomery, Grant
Hayward, Nick
Green, Adele C.
Whiteman, David C.
Webb, Penelope M.
for the Study of Digestive Health and Australian Cancer Study
Title High intake of folate from food sources is associated with reduced risk of esophageal cancer in an Australian population
Journal name Journal of Nutrition   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-3166
1541-6100
Publication date 2011-02-01
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3945/jn.110.131235
Volume 141
Issue 2
Start page 274
End page 283
Total pages 10
Place of publication Bethesda, MD, United States
Publisher American Society for Nutrition
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Folate plays a key role in DNA synthesis and methylation. Limited evidence suggests high intake may reduce risks of esophageal cancer overall; however, associations with esophageal cancer subtypes and Barrett's esophagus (BE), a precancerous lesion, remain unexplored. We evaluated the relation between intake of folate, B vitamins, and methyl-group donors (methionine, choline, betaine) from foods and supplements, polymorphisms in key folate-metabolizing genes, and risk ofBE, esophageal adenocarcinoma(EAC), andesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in 2 population-basedcase-control studies inAustralia. BE patientswithout (n=266)orwith (n=101) dysplasiawere comparedwith population controls (n=577); similarly, EAC (n = 636) or ESCC (n = 245) patients were compared with population controls (n = 1507) using multivariable adjusted logistic regression. Increasing intake of folate from foods was associated with reduced EAC risk (P-trend = 0.01) and mitigated the increased risks of ESCC associated with smoking and alcohol consumption. In contrast, high intake of folic acid from supplements was associated with a significantly elevated risk of BE with dysplasia. High intakes of riboflavin and methionine from food were associated with increased EAC risk, whereas increasing betaine intake was associated with reduced risks of BE without (P-trend = 0.004) or with dysplasia (P-trend = 0.02). Supplemental thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, and vitamin B-12 were associated with increased EAC risk. There were no consistent associations between genetic polymorphisms studied and BE or EAC risk. High intake of folate-containing foods may reduce risk of EAC, but our data raise the possibility that folic acid supplementation may increase risks of BE with dysplasia and EAC.
Keyword Squamous-cell carcinoma
One-carbon metabolism
Body-mass index
Gastric cardia
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes First published December 22, 2010

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Public Health Publications
 
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