Ibuprofen-loaded poly(epsilon-caprolactone) layered silicate nanocomposites prepared by hot melt extrusion

Campbell, Kayleen T., Craig, Duncan Q. M. and McNally, Tony (2010). Ibuprofen-loaded poly(epsilon-caprolactone) layered silicate nanocomposites prepared by hot melt extrusion. In: Nicholas J. Dunne, Selected papers from the Northern Ireland Biomedical Engineering Society Spring Meeting. 29th Northern Ireland Biomedical Engineering Conference (NIBES 2009), Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom, (2307-2316). 8 April 2009. doi:10.1007/s10856-009-3963-2


Author Campbell, Kayleen T.
Craig, Duncan Q. M.
McNally, Tony
Title of paper Ibuprofen-loaded poly(epsilon-caprolactone) layered silicate nanocomposites prepared by hot melt extrusion
Formatted title
Ibuprofen-loaded poly(ε-caprolactone) layered silicate nanocomposites prepared by hot melt extrusion
Conference name 29th Northern Ireland Biomedical Engineering Conference (NIBES 2009)
Conference location Belfast, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom
Conference dates 8 April 2009
Proceedings title Selected papers from the Northern Ireland Biomedical Engineering Society Spring Meeting   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Secaucus, NJ, United States
Publisher Springer New York LLC
Publication Year 2010
Year available 2009
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1007/s10856-009-3963-2
ISSN 0957-4530
0957-4530
Editor Nicholas J. Dunne
Volume 21
Issue 8
Start page 2307
End page 2316
Total pages 10
Language eng
Abstract/Summary buprofen loaded poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) layered silicate nanocomposites were prepared by hot-melt extrusion. The morphology and extent of dispersion of ibuprofen and layered silicate was studied using a combination of wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Exhaustive examination across the length scales revealed the composite to have both an intercalated and exfoliated morphology. The ibuprofen was well dispersed and distributed throughout the PCL matrix. Most significantly, the static tensile and dynamic mechanical properties of PCL can be manipulated as a function of nanoclay loading and is dependent on the aspect ratio of clay platelets. The glass transition of PCL increased by up to 16°C on addition of nanoclay, as determined from dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). This behaviour was attributed to the constrained mobility of PCL chains intercalated between clay platelets and to the tethering of PCL chains by hydrogen bonding with platelet edges. As a consequence, PCL crystallisation was inhibited and confirmed from non-isothermal crystallisation experiments using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The fraction of PCL that was crystalline (Xc) decreased by 15% on addition of ibuprofen and nanoclay, although the temperature of crystallisation (Tc) did not change significantly. The dissolution of ibuprofen from PCL can be retarded by addition of layered silicates (nanoclays) to the polymer matrix.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes Published online: 23 December 2009

Document type: Conference Paper
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