Evaluation of a caregiver education program to support memory and communication in dementia: A controlled pretest-posttest study with nursing home staff

Broughton, Megan, Smith, Erin R., Baker, Rosemary, Angwin, Anthony J., Pachana, Nancy A., Copland, David A., Humphreys, Michael S., Gallois, Cindy, Byrne, Gerard J. and Chenery, Helen J. (2011) Evaluation of a caregiver education program to support memory and communication in dementia: A controlled pretest-posttest study with nursing home staff. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 48 11: 1436-1444. doi:10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2011.05.007


Author Broughton, Megan
Smith, Erin R.
Baker, Rosemary
Angwin, Anthony J.
Pachana, Nancy A.
Copland, David A.
Humphreys, Michael S.
Gallois, Cindy
Byrne, Gerard J.
Chenery, Helen J.
Title Evaluation of a caregiver education program to support memory and communication in dementia: A controlled pretest-posttest study with nursing home staff
Journal name International Journal of Nursing Studies   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0020-7489
1873-491X
Publication date 2011-11
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2011.05.007
Volume 48
Issue 11
Start page 1436
End page 1444
Total pages 9
Place of publication Bromley, U.K.
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: There is a need for simple multimedia training programs designed to upskill the dementia care workforce. A DVD-based training program entitled RECAPS and MESSAGE has been designed to provide caregivers with strategies to support memory and communication in people with dementia.

Objectives: The aims of this study were: (1) to evaluate the effects of the RECAPS and MESSAGE training on knowledge of support strategies, and caregiver satisfaction, in nursing home care staff, and (2) to evaluate staff opinion of the training.

Design: A multi-centre controlled pretest–posttest trial was conducted between June 2009 and January 2010, with baseline, immediately post-training and 3-month follow-up assessment.

Setting: Four nursing homes in Queensland, Australia.

Participants: All care staff were invited to participate. Of the 68 participants who entered the study, 52 (37 training participants and 15 controls) completed outcome measures at baseline and 3-month follow-up. 63.5% of participants were nursing assistants, 25% were qualified nurses and 11.5% were recreational/activities officers.

Methods: The training and control groups were compared on the following outcomes: (1) knowledge of memory and communication support strategies, and (2) caregiver satisfaction. In the training group, the immediate effects of training on knowledge, and the effects of role (nurse, nursing assistant, recreational staff) on both outcome measures, were also examined. Staff opinion of the training was assessed immediately post-training and at 3-month follow-up.

Results: The training group showed a significant improvement in knowledge of support strategies from baseline to immediately post-training (p = 0.001). Comparison of the training and control groups revealed a significant increase in knowledge for the training group (p = 0.011), but not for the control group (p = 0.33), between baseline and 3-month follow-up. Examination of caregiver satisfaction by care staff role in the training group revealed that only the qualified nurses showed higher levels of caregiver satisfaction at 3-month follow-up (p = 0.013). Staff rated the training positively both for usefulness and applicability.

Conclusion: The RECAPS and MESSAGE training improved nursing home care staff's knowledge of support strategies for memory and communication, and gains were maintained at 3-month follow-up. Moreover, the training was well received by staff.
Keyword Dementia
Education and training
Evaluation studies
Memory and communication
Nursing
Nursing home
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 11 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Fri, 09 Sep 2011, 14:00:02 EST by Matthew Lamb on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences