Fall field crickets did not acclimate to simulated seasonal changes in temperature

Niehaus, Amanda C., Wilson, Robbie S., Storm, Jonathan J. and Angilletta, Michael J. (2012) Fall field crickets did not acclimate to simulated seasonal changes in temperature. Journal of Comparative Physiology B: Biochemical Systemic And Environmental Physiology, 182 2: 199-207. doi:10.1007/s00360-011-0611-1


Author Niehaus, Amanda C.
Wilson, Robbie S.
Storm, Jonathan J.
Angilletta, Michael J.
Title Fall field crickets did not acclimate to simulated seasonal changes in temperature
Journal name Journal of Comparative Physiology B: Biochemical Systemic And Environmental Physiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0174-1578
1432-136X
Publication date 2012-02
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00360-011-0611-1
Volume 182
Issue 2
Start page 199
End page 207
Total pages 9
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
In nature, many organisms alter their developmental trajectory in response to environmental variation. However, studies of thermal acclimation have historically involved stable, unrealistic thermal treatments. In our study, we incorporated ecologically relevant treatments to examine the effects of environmental stochasticity on the thermal acclimation of the fall field cricket (Gryllus pennsylvanicus). We raised crickets for 5 weeks at either a constant temperature (25°C) or at one of three thermal regimes mimicking a seasonal decline in temperature (from 25 to 12°C). The latter three treatments differed in their level of thermal stochasticity: crickets experienced either no diel cycle, a predictable diel cycle, or an unpredictable diel cycle. Following these treatments, we measured several traits considered relevant to survival or reproduction, including growth rate, jumping velocity, feeding rate, metabolic rate, and cold tolerance. Contrary to our predictions, the acclimatory responses of crickets were
unrelated to the magnitude or type of thermal variation. Furthermore, acclimation of performance was not ubiquitous among traits. We recommend additional studies of acclimation in fluctuating environments to assess the generality of these findings.
Keyword Temperature
Acclimation
Seasonality
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 9 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 9 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 07 Sep 2011, 11:00:41 EST by Gail Walter on behalf of School of Biological Sciences