The role of deep reefs in shallow reef recovery: An assessment of vertical connectivity in a brooding coral from west and east Australia

van Oppen, Madeleine J. H., Bongaerts, Pim, Underwood, Jim N., Peplow, Lesa M. and Cooper, Timothy F. (2011) The role of deep reefs in shallow reef recovery: An assessment of vertical connectivity in a brooding coral from west and east Australia. Molecular Ecology, 20 8: 1647-1660. doi:10.1111/j.1365-294X.2011.05050.x


Author van Oppen, Madeleine J. H.
Bongaerts, Pim
Underwood, Jim N.
Peplow, Lesa M.
Cooper, Timothy F.
Title The role of deep reefs in shallow reef recovery: An assessment of vertical connectivity in a brooding coral from west and east Australia
Journal name Molecular Ecology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0962-1083
1365-294X
Publication date 2011-04-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2011.05050.x
Volume 20
Issue 8
Start page 1647
End page 1660
Total pages 14
Place of publication Oxford, U.K.
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Approximately one quarter of zooxanthellate coral species have a depth distribution from shallow waters (<30 m) down to mesophotic depths of 30–60 m. The deeper populations of such species are less likely to be affected by certain environmental perturbations, including high temperature/high irradiance causing coral bleaching. This has led to the hypothesis that deep populations may serve as refuges and a source of recruits for shallow reef habitats. The extent of vertical connectivity of reef coral species, however, is largely unquantified. Using 10 coral host microsatellite loci and sequences of the host mtDNA putative control region, as well as ribosomal DNA (rDNA) ITS2 sequences of the coral’s algal endosymbionts (Symbiodinium), we examine population structure, connectivity and symbiont specificity in the brooding coral Seriatopora hystrix across a depth profile in both northwest (Scott Reef) and northeast Australia (Yonge Reef). Strong genetic structuring over depth was observed in both regions based on the microsatellite loci; however, Yonge Reef exhibited an additional partitioning of mtDNA lineages (associated with specific symbiont ITS2 types), whereas Scott Reef was dominated by a single mtDNA lineage (with no apparent host-symbiont specificity). Evidence for recruitment of larvae of deep water origin into shallow habitats was found at Scott Reef, suggesting that recovery of shallow water habitats may be aided by migration from deep water refuges. Conversely, no migration from the genetically divergent deep slope populations into the shallow habitats was evident at Yonge Reef, making recovery of shallow habitats from deeper waters at this location highly unlikely.
Keyword Coral recovery
Coral reef
Deep reef refugia hypothesis
Gene flow
Seriatopora hystrix
Symbiodinium
Great-barrier-reef
Genetic differentiationmeasure.
Nino southern oscillation
Conservation genetics
Seriatopora-hystrix
Caribbean coral
Building corals
Diversity
Populations
Symbiodinium
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Global Change Institute Publications
Official 2012 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 53 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 63 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 07 Sep 2011, 00:01:48 EST by Gail Walter on behalf of Global Change Institute