The meaning of Nursing Home: 'Waiting to go up to the St Peter... OK! Waiting house... sad but true'

Tuckett, Anthony G. (2005). The meaning of Nursing Home: 'Waiting to go up to the St Peter... OK! Waiting house... sad but true'. In: Lynne Parkinson, 38th National Conference of the Australian Association of Gerontology Abstracts. AAG 2005: 38th National Conference of the Australian Association of Gerontology, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia, (A61-A61). 9-11 November 2005. doi:10.1111/j.1741-6612.2005.00130.x


Author Tuckett, Anthony G.
Title of paper The meaning of Nursing Home: 'Waiting to go up to the St Peter... OK! Waiting house... sad but true'
Conference name AAG 2005: 38th National Conference of the Australian Association of Gerontology
Conference location Gold Coast, QLD, Australia
Conference dates 9-11 November 2005
Proceedings title 38th National Conference of the Australian Association of Gerontology Abstracts   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Australasian Journal on Ageing   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Publication Year 2005
Sub-type Published abstract
DOI 10.1111/j.1741-6612.2005.00130.x
ISSN 1440-6381
1741-6612
Editor Lynne Parkinson
Volume 24
Issue Supp. s2
Start page A61
End page A61
Total pages 1
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
This article reports on the findings associated with research participants’ perceptions about residency – that is, the nursing home. These findings stem from a much larger qualitative study that explored the meaning of truth-telling within the care provider – older person dyad in high-level (nursing home) aged-care. Arguably, the perceptions expressed here by personal care assistants (personal carer, enrolled nurse), registered nurses and the nursing home residents suggest that the ‘home away from home’ is much less than that, and not one would look forward to going to. The thesis is that the health of the resident in a nursing home is directly linked to care provision that encourages autonomy. Residency that claims to have as its primary focus ‘the resident’ ought to take seriously the residents’ health and therefore the residents’ autonomy. However, a residency that is described as endowed with suspicious awareness and mutual pretence, overloaded with tasks, short of staff and starved of time with little engagement with the residents does fail to adequately understand this link.
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published under "Posters" as Abstract #185.

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 06 Sep 2011, 13:40:52 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work