Vicariance and dispersal across an intermittent barrier: population genetic structure of marine animals across the Torres Strait land bridge

Mirams, A.G.K., Treml, E.A., Shields, J.L., Liggins, L. and Riginos, C. (2011) Vicariance and dispersal across an intermittent barrier: population genetic structure of marine animals across the Torres Strait land bridge. Coral Reefs, 30 4: 937-949. doi:10.1007/s00338-011-0767-x


Author Mirams, A.G.K.
Treml, E.A.
Shields, J.L.
Liggins, L.
Riginos, C.
Title Vicariance and dispersal across an intermittent barrier: population genetic structure of marine animals across the Torres Strait land bridge
Journal name Coral Reefs   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0722-4028
Publication date 2011-12
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00338-011-0767-x
Volume 30
Issue 4
Start page 937
End page 949
Total pages 13
Place of publication Germany
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Abstract Biogeographic barriers, some transitory in duration, are likely to have been important contributing factors to modern marine biodiversity in the Indo-Pacific region. One such barrier was the Torres Strait land bridge between continental Australia and New Guinea that persisted through much of the late Pleistocene and separated Indian and Pacific Ocean taxa. Here, we examine the patterns of mitochondrial DNA diversity for marine animals with present-day distributions spanning the Torres Strait. Specifically, we investigate whether there are concordant signatures across species, consistent with either vicariance or recent colonization from either ocean basin. We survey four species of reef fishes (Apogon doederleini, Pomacentrus coelestis, Dascyllus trimaculatus, and Acanthurus triostegus) for mtDNA cytochrome oxidase 1 and control region variation and contrast these results to previous mtDNA studies in diverse marine animals with similar distributions. We find substantial genetic partitioning (estimated from F-statistics and coalescent approaches) between Indian and Pacific Ocean populations for many species, consistent with regional persistence through the late Pleistocene in both ocean basins. The species-specific estimates of genetic divergence, however, vary greatly and for reef fishes we estimate substantially different divergence times among species. It is likely that Indian and Pacific Ocean populations have been isolated for multiple glacial cycles for some species, whereas for other species genetic connections have been more recent. Regional estimates of genetic diversity and directionality of gene flow also vary among species. Thus, there is no apparent consistency among historical patterns across the Torres Strait for these co-distributed marine animals
Keyword Australia
Coalescence
Comparative phylogeography
Coral triangle
Gene flow
Planktonic larval dispersal
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 06 Sep 2011, 09:49:33 EST by Dr Eric Treml on behalf of School of Biological Sciences