Enzymatic digestion in stomachless fishes: How a simple gut accommodates both herbivory and carnivory

Day, Ryan D., German, Donovan P., Manjakasy, Jennifer M., Farr, Ingrid, Hansen, Mitchell Jay and Tibbetts, Ian R. (2011) Enzymatic digestion in stomachless fishes: How a simple gut accommodates both herbivory and carnivory. Journal of Comparative Physiology B: Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology, 181 5: 603-613. doi:10.1007/s00360-010-0546-y


Author Day, Ryan D.
German, Donovan P.
Manjakasy, Jennifer M.
Farr, Ingrid
Hansen, Mitchell Jay
Tibbetts, Ian R.
Title Enzymatic digestion in stomachless fishes: How a simple gut accommodates both herbivory and carnivory
Journal name Journal of Comparative Physiology B: Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0174-1578
1432-136X
Publication date 2011-07
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00360-010-0546-y
Volume 181
Issue 5
Start page 603
End page 613
Total pages 11
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The lack of a stomach is not uncommon amongst teleost fishes, yet our understanding of this reductive specialisation is lacking. The absence of a stomach does not restrict trophic preference, resulting in fishes with very similar alimentary morphology capable of digesting differing diets. We examined the digestive biochemistry of four beloniform fishes: two herbivorous halfbeaks (Hemiramphidae) and two carnivorous needlefish (Belonidae) to determine how these fishes digest their respective diets with their simple, short gut. We found that although the halfbeaks showed significantly greater α-amylase activity than that of the needlefish (P < 0.01), trypsin, lipase, aminopeptidase and maltase activity were not substantially different between the two families. We also found that habitat (freshwater vs. marine) appears to play a significant role in digestive capability, as the two freshwater taxa and the two marine taxa were significantly different (ANOSIM; dietary Gobal R = 0.544, P = 0.001, habitat Global R = 0.437, P = 0.001), despite their phyletic and dietary similarities. Our findings offer partial support for the adaptive modulation hypothesis, support the Plug-Flow Reactor model of digestion in herbivorous halfbeaks and also support the compartmental model of digestion but suggest that another model is required to describe stomachless carnivorous needlefish.
Keyword Hemiramphidae
Belonidae
Adaptive modulation hypothesis
Compartmental model
Plug-flow reactor
Salinity
Garfish hyporhamphus-melanochir
Nutritional ecology
Feeding-habits
Labroid fishes
Marine fish
Odax-pullus
Teleostei
Seagrass
Growth
Diet
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Communicated by I.D. Hume.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 02 Sep 2011, 10:23:16 EST by Gail Walter on behalf of School of Biological Sciences