Factors associated with not seeking professional help or disclosing intent prior to suicide : A study of medical examiners' records in Nova Scotia

Kisely, Stephen, Campbell, Leslie Anne, Cartwright, Jennifer, Bowes, Matthew J. and Jackson, Lois (2011) Factors associated with not seeking professional help or disclosing intent prior to suicide : A study of medical examiners' records in Nova Scotia. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 56 7: 436-440.

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Author Kisely, Stephen
Campbell, Leslie Anne
Cartwright, Jennifer
Bowes, Matthew J.
Jackson, Lois
Title Factors associated with not seeking professional help or disclosing intent prior to suicide : A study of medical examiners' records in Nova Scotia
Journal name Canadian Journal of Psychiatry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0706-7437
1497-0015
Publication date 2011-07
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 56
Issue 7
Start page 436
End page 440
Total pages 5
Place of publication Thousand Oaks, California, United States
Publisher Sage Publications
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: Individual-level data from clinical settings lack information on people who did not seek professional help prior to suicide. We used records of the Nova Scotia Medical Examiner Service (NSMES) to compare people who had contact with a health professional prior to suicide with those who did not. Method: We linked data from the NSMES to routine administrative data of the province. Results: The NSMES recorded 108 suicides in Nova Scotia from January 1, 2006, to December 31, 2006; there were 90 male and 18 female suicide deaths. Mean and median age at death were 44.73 (SD 13.33) and 44 years, respectively. Patients aged 40 to 49 years made up one-third of the cases (n = 35) and this was the decade of life with the highest number of suicides. This was also the group least likely to have suicidal intent recorded in the NSMES files (χ2 = 3.86, df = 1, P = 0.05). Otherwise, there were no significant differences between people who sought help, or disclosed intent, prior to suicide and people who did not. The samples in all cases were predominately male and single. Conclusions: People aged 40 to 49 years were the age group with the highest absolute number of suicides, but were the least likely to have suicidal intent recorded in the NSMES files. This finding merits further investigation. Medical examiner or coroner data may provide additional information not obtained elsewhere for the surveillance of suicide.
Keyword Health Outcomes
Mental health services
Suicide
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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