Muscle strength and muscle power training in older adults: Effects of gender on change

Henwood, Timothy (2007). Muscle strength and muscle power training in older adults: Effects of gender on change. In: Susan Quine, 40th National Conference of the Australian Association of Gerontology: Oral Abstracts. BeyOND 007. Ageing: Evolution and Revolution. Australian Association of Gerontology 40th National Conference (AAG 2007), Adelaide, SA, Australia, (A18-A19). 21-23 November 2007. doi:10.1111/j.1741-6612.2007.00254.x


Author Henwood, Timothy
Title of paper Muscle strength and muscle power training in older adults: Effects of gender on change
Conference name BeyOND 007. Ageing: Evolution and Revolution. Australian Association of Gerontology 40th National Conference (AAG 2007)
Conference location Adelaide, SA, Australia
Conference dates 21-23 November 2007
Convener The Australian Association of Gerontology (AAG)
Proceedings title 40th National Conference of the Australian Association of Gerontology: Oral Abstracts   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Australasian Journal on Ageing   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Publication Year 2007
Sub-type Published abstract
DOI 10.1111/j.1741-6612.2007.00254.x
ISSN 1440-6381
1741-6612
Editor Susan Quine
Volume 26
Issue Supp. 1
Start page A18
End page A19
Total pages 2
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
The use of resistance training to improve muscle function among older adults has received significant attention. However, few studies have investigated the impact of training cessation and the disparity in training response of men and women. Consequently, the purpose of this study was to compare the effects of training on muscle strength and power in older men and women following training, detraining and retraining.

While these results suggest variations in the response of older men and women to high-intensity training, the positive impact of resistance training on muscle function for older adults is supported. Moreover, this study shows that significant losses resulting from detraining are regained with short-term retraining.
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Fri, 26 Aug 2011, 13:57:12 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences