Testing for spatial neglect with line bisection and target cancellation: Are both tasks really unrelated?

Molenberghs, Pascal and Sale, Martin V. (2011) Testing for spatial neglect with line bisection and target cancellation: Are both tasks really unrelated?. Plos One, 6 7: e23017-1-e23017-5. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0023017


Author Molenberghs, Pascal
Sale, Martin V.
Title Testing for spatial neglect with line bisection and target cancellation: Are both tasks really unrelated?
Journal name Plos One   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1932-6203
Publication date 2011-07
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0023017
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 6
Issue 7
Start page e23017-1
End page e23017-5
Total pages 5
Place of publication San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.
Publisher Public Library of Science
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Abstract Damage to the parietal lobe can induce a condition known as spatial neglect, characterized by a lack of awareness of the personal and/or extrapersonal space opposite the damaged brain region. Spatial neglect is commonly assessed clinically using either the line bisection or the target cancellation task. However, it is unclear whether poor performance on each of these two tasks is associated with the same or different lesion locations. To date, methodological limitations and differences have prevented a definitive link between task performance and lesion location to be made. Here we report findings from a voxel-based lesion symptom mapping (VLSM) analysis of an unbiased selection of 44 patients with a recent unifocal stroke. Patients performed both the line bisection and target cancellation task. For each of the two tasks a continuous score was incorporated into the VLSM analysis. Both tasks correlated highly with each other (r = .76) and VLSM analyses indicated that the angular gyrus was the critical lesion site for both tasks. The results suggest that both tasks probe the same underlying cortical deficits and although the cancellation task was more sensitive than the line bisection task, both can be used in a clinical setting to test for spatial neglect.
Keyword Visual Neglect
Hemispatial Neglect
Visuospatial Neglect
Hemisphere Stroke
Parietal Cortex
Brain Networks
Anatomy
Attention
Awareness
Sensitivity
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article no. e23017.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
Official 2012 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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