The Australian national survey of the epidemiology of psychosis: Aims and preliminary findings

Morgan, Vera Anne, Jablensky, A. V., Wattereus, A., Bush, R., Carr, V., Castle, D., Cohen, M., Galletly, C., Harvey, C., Hocking, B., Mackinnon, A., McGorry, P., McGrath, J., Neil, A., Saw, S. and Stain, H. (2011). The Australian national survey of the epidemiology of psychosis: Aims and preliminary findings. In: Supplement to Schizophrenia Bulletin: Abstracts of the 13th International Congress on Schizophrenia Research (ICOSR). 13th International Congress on Schizophrenia Research (ICOSR), Colorado Springs CO, United States, (57-57). 2-6 April 2011. doi:10.1093/schbul/sbq173


Author Morgan, Vera Anne
Jablensky, A. V.
Wattereus, A.
Bush, R.
Carr, V.
Castle, D.
Cohen, M.
Galletly, C.
Harvey, C.
Hocking, B.
Mackinnon, A.
McGorry, P.
McGrath, J.
Neil, A.
Saw, S.
Stain, H.
Title of paper The Australian national survey of the epidemiology of psychosis: Aims and preliminary findings
Conference name 13th International Congress on Schizophrenia Research (ICOSR)
Conference location Colorado Springs CO, United States
Conference dates 2-6 April 2011
Proceedings title Supplement to Schizophrenia Bulletin: Abstracts of the 13th International Congress on Schizophrenia Research (ICOSR)   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Schizophrenia Bulletin   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Oxford University Press
Publication Year 2011
Sub-type Published abstract
DOI 10.1093/schbul/sbq173
Open Access Status
ISSN 1745-1701
0586-7614
Volume 37
Issue Supp. 1
Start page 57
End page 57
Total pages 1
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Background: In 2010, the second national epidemiological survey of psychosis in Australia (Survey of High Impact Psychosis - SHIP) collected representative data from seven catchments across five states on the prevalence and profile of psychosis.

Methods: The survey used a two-phase design: a brief psychosis screener followed by a detailed diagnostic interview. We screened 10 662 people who met age and postcode criteria: 76.7% were screen-positive with 37% aged 18–34 and 63% aged 35–64. We randomly selected 2000 screen-positive people for interview, stratified by age group. Questions covered: functioning and socialization; physical health; psychopathology and cognition; and service utilization and need. Internationally novel components were: (i) brief assessment of cognitive function; (ii) clinical assessment of physical comorbidity and collection of metabolic measures; (iii) concurrent collection of blood for genetic analysis; and (iv) detailed assessment of social roles including role support. Replication of key questions in the first national psychosis survey in 1997 provided a measure of change. Alignment with the 2007 Australian general population mental health survey permitted benchmarking against population
data.

Results: By September 2010, 1026 interviews had been completed with 67% entered in the study database that includes 1500 variables. Two thirds of the sample were male, one-half with an ICD-10 diagnosis of schizophrenia. Levels of smoking, drug and alcohol abuse/dependence had increased markedly since the 1997 survey. There was a noticeable difference in the percentage with a chronic and/or deteriorating course of illness (down to 30% from 43%); more work is needed to identify whether this is related to changes in service provision/treatment, sample characteristics or subtle changes in criteria for classifying course patterns. Among the main three challenges named by participants were financial difficulties (41%), unemployment (37%), loneliness (36%), poor physical health (28%) and uncontrolled symptoms of mental illness (24%). Enumeration will finish in December 2010 with analysis of the full dataset complete in early 2011.

Conclusion: Novel strategies to quantify cognitive function, assess physical health, collect genetic data, capture social roles and map pathways to recovery within a national, epidemiological framework are of international interest. Data generated will support new models within mental health services to engage people with psychosis in a long-term recovery process.
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published under 6. Epidemiology: Abstracts of the 13th International Congress on Schizophrenia Research (ICOSR).

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Non HERDC
Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 16 Aug 2011, 15:22:06 EST by Mr Stephen Woods on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute