Evaluation of EGFR mutations in NSCLC using ME-PCR and HRM

Sriram, K. B., Tan, M. E., Savarimuthu Francis, S. M., Wright, C. M., Relan, V., Martins, M. U., Bowman, R. V., Yang, I. A. and Fong, K. M. (2011). Evaluation of EGFR mutations in NSCLC using ME-PCR and HRM. In: Supplement to Journal of Thoracic Oncology: 3rd Australian Lung Cancer Conference (ALCC). 3rd Australian Lung Cancer Conference (ALCC), Melbourne VIC, Australia, (S7-S7). 6-8 October 2011. doi:10.1097/01.JTO.0000394634.73009.dc


Author Sriram, K. B.
Tan, M. E.
Savarimuthu Francis, S. M.
Wright, C. M.
Relan, V.
Martins, M. U.
Bowman, R. V.
Yang, I. A.
Fong, K. M.
Title of paper Evaluation of EGFR mutations in NSCLC using ME-PCR and HRM
Conference name 3rd Australian Lung Cancer Conference (ALCC)
Conference location Melbourne VIC, Australia
Conference dates 6-8 October 2011
Proceedings title Supplement to Journal of Thoracic Oncology: 3rd Australian Lung Cancer Conference (ALCC)   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Journal of Thoracic Oncology   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Philadelphia PA, United States
Publisher Lippincott Willams & Wilkins
Publication Year 2011
Sub-type Published abstract
DOI 10.1097/01.JTO.0000394634.73009.dc
Open Access Status
ISSN 1556-0864
1556-1380
Volume 6
Issue 3, Supp. 1
Start page S7
End page S7
Total pages 1
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
NSCLC patients with EGFR mutations have improved survival when treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). Many methods are able to detect EGFR mutations in patient samples, but most are technically difficult and resource intensive. Mutant enriched PCR (ME-PCR) assay and high resolution melt analysis (HRM) are easy to perform and inexpensive. The current study was designed to assess ME-PCR and HRM in screening for EGFR mutations in NSCLC tissue and matched serum samples.

Methods: We examined EGFR mutation status (exon 19 DEL and exon 21 L858R) in DNA obtained from 522 primary NSCLC frozen tumour (surgically resected) and 64 matched serums using ME-PCR and HRM. In addition, DNA sequencing was performed on 134/522 tissues to validate ME-PCR and HRM findings.

Results: EGFR mutations were detected in 5.2% (27/522) by ME-PCR and HRM. ME-PCR detected 11 DEL and 16 L858R mutations and HRM detected 9 DEL and 18 L858R mutations. The sensitivity of ME-PCR and HRM were 100% and 96%, while the specificities were 96% and 98% respectively. Matched serum DNA was available for 6 EGFR mutation patients (2 DEL and 4 L858R) and 58 EGFR wild-type patients. ME-PCR detected mutations in 3 serums (2-DEL and 1-L858R) and HRM detected mutations in 2 serums (1-DEL and 1-L858R).

Conclusion: ME-PCR and HRM have comparable diagnostic accuracy in detecting EGFR mutations in tumour tissue. Both ME-PCR and HRM are able to detect EGFR mutations in serum of NSCLC patients. These findings will need to be validated in a large scale prospective study.
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published under Young Investigator/Fellow Abstract Orals: 3rd Australian Lung Cancer Conference (ALCC).

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Temporary Review
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Created: Tue, 16 Aug 2011, 12:51:37 EST by Mr Stephen Woods on behalf of School of Medicine