Surface protein coverage and its implications on spray-drying of model sugar-rich foods: Solubility, powder production and characterisation

Jayasundera, Mithila, Adhikari, Benu, Howes, Tony and Aldred, Peter (2011) Surface protein coverage and its implications on spray-drying of model sugar-rich foods: Solubility, powder production and characterisation. Food Chemistry, 128 4: 1003-1016. doi:10.1016/j.foodchem.2011.04.006


Author Jayasundera, Mithila
Adhikari, Benu
Howes, Tony
Aldred, Peter
Title Surface protein coverage and its implications on spray-drying of model sugar-rich foods: Solubility, powder production and characterisation
Journal name Food Chemistry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0308-8146
1873-7072
Publication date 2011-10
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.foodchem.2011.04.006
Volume 128
Issue 4
Start page 1003
End page 1016
Total pages 14
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
We have investigated the amount of protein required to produce amorphous sugar powders through spray-drying. Pea protein isolate was used as a model plant protein and sodium caseinate was used as a model dairy protein. Powder recovery in a laboratory spray dryer was used as a measure of the ease of spray drying for a given formulation. More than 80% of amorphous sucrose and fructose was produced with the addition of sodium caseinate, while the pea protein isolate was able to produce only recoveries of less than 50% of amorphous sucrose. Sensitivity of low molecular weight surfactants has been demonstrated using both ionic (sodium stearoyl lactylate) and non-ionic (polysorbate-80) surfactants. Spray-dried powders were subjected to physico-chemical characterisation and dissolution experiments. The maximum solubility of all powders was obtained after 5 min of dissolution. The solubility of the sodium caseinate increased by 6–7% in the presence of fructose and low molecular weight surfactants. The solubility of the amorphous powders of sucrose–pea protein isolate was found to be lower than amorphous powders of sucrose–sodium caseinate and fructose–sodium caseinate. The addition of sucrose in water increased the solubility of the pea protein isolate from 16.84% to more than 83%. The non-ionic surfactant (Tween-80) has reduced the solubility of sucrose–pea protein isolate–Tween-80 powders significantly (p < 0.05) compared to those of sucrose–pea protein isolate–sodium stearoyl lactylate powders. The solubility of sucrose–sodium caseinate powders was comparable to that of pure sodium caseinate, indicating that addition of sucrose into 0.13% sodium caseinate does not have any significant effect on the solubility of this protein at this concentration.
Keyword Sugar-rich foods
Spray drying
Stickiness
Pea protein isolate
Sodium caseinate
Low molecular weight surfactants
Dissolution
Surface protein coverage
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Available online 8 April 2011

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Chemical Engineering Publications
Official 2012 Collection
 
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