Epigenetic mechanisms mediating vulnerability and resilience to psychiatric disorders

Dudley, Kevin J., Li, Xiang, Kobor, Michael S., Kippin, Tod E. and Bredy, Timothy W. (2011) Epigenetic mechanisms mediating vulnerability and resilience to psychiatric disorders. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 35 7: 1544-1551. doi:10.1016/j.neubiorev.2010.12.016


Author Dudley, Kevin J.
Li, Xiang
Kobor, Michael S.
Kippin, Tod E.
Bredy, Timothy W.
Title Epigenetic mechanisms mediating vulnerability and resilience to psychiatric disorders
Journal name Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0149-7634
1873-7528
Publication date 2011-06
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2010.12.016
Volume 35
Issue 7
Start page 1544
End page 1551
Total pages 8
Place of publication East Park, Kidlington, Oxford, U.K.
Publisher Pergamon
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The impact that stressful encounters have upon long-lasting behavioural phenotypes is varied. Whereas a significant proportion of the population will develop “stress-related” conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder or depression in later life, the majority are considered “resilient” and are able to cope with stress and avoid such psychopathologies. The reason for this heterogeneity is undoubtedly multi-factorial, involving a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors. Both genes and environment are of critical importance when it comes to developmental processes, and it appears that subtle differences in either of these may be responsible for altering developmental trajectories that confer vulnerability or resilience. At the molecular level, developmental processes are regulated by epigenetic mechanisms, with recent clinical and pre-clinical data obtained by ourselves and others suggesting that epigenetic differences in various regions of the brain are associated with a range of psychiatric disorders, including many that are stress-related. Here we provide an overview of how these epigenetic differences, and hence susceptibility to psychiatric disorders, might arise through exposure to stress-related factors during critical periods of development.
Keyword Epigenetics
Development
Vulnerability
Resilience
Hippocampal glucocorticoid-receptors
Histone lysine methylation
Rat prefrontal cortex
Early-life stress
Prenatal stress
Gene-expression
DNA methylation
Long-term
Environmental enrichment
Maternal separation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
Official 2012 Collection
 
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