Population genetics of the frog-killing fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis

Morgan, Jess A. T., Vredenburg, Vance T., Rachowicz, Lara J., Knapp, Roland A., Stice, Mary J., Tunstall, Tate, Bingham, Rob E., Parker, John M., Longcore, Joyce E., Moritz, Craig, Briggs, Cheryl J. and Taylor, John W. (2007) Population genetics of the frog-killing fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 104 34: 13845-13850. doi:10.1073/pnas.0701838104


Author Morgan, Jess A. T.
Vredenburg, Vance T.
Rachowicz, Lara J.
Knapp, Roland A.
Stice, Mary J.
Tunstall, Tate
Bingham, Rob E.
Parker, John M.
Longcore, Joyce E.
Moritz, Craig
Briggs, Cheryl J.
Taylor, John W.
Title Population genetics of the frog-killing fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis
Journal name Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0027-8424
1091-6490
Publication date 2007-08-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1073/pnas.0701838104
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 104
Issue 34
Start page 13845
End page 13850
Total pages 6
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher National Academy of Sciences
Language eng
Abstract Global amphibian decline by chytridiomycosis is a major environmental disaster that has been attributed to either recent fungal spread or environmental change that promotes disease. Here, we present a population genetic comparison of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis isolates from an intensively studied region of frog decline, the Sierra Nevada of California. In support of a novel pathogen, we find low diversity, no amphibian-host specificity, little correlation between fungal genotype and geography, local frog extirpation by a single fungal genotype, and evidence of human-assisted fungus migration. In support of endemism, at a local scale, we find some diverse, recombining populations. Therefore neither epidemic spread nor endemism alone explains this particular amphibian decline. Recombination raises the possibility of resistant sporangia and a mechanism for rapid spread as well as persistence that could greatly complicate global control of the pathogen.
Keyword Chytridiomycosis
Global spread
Recombination
Enigmatic amphibian decline
Emerging infectious disease
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
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