Contested territories: The construction of boundaries between alternative and conventional cancer treatments

Broom, Alex (2002) Contested territories: The construction of boundaries between alternative and conventional cancer treatments. New Zealand Sociology, 17 2: 215-234.

Author Broom, Alex
Title Contested territories: The construction of boundaries between alternative and conventional cancer treatments
Journal name New Zealand Sociology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0112-921X
1173-1036
Publication date 2002
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 17
Issue 2
Start page 215
End page 234
Total pages 20
Place of publication Hamilton, New Zealand
Publisher Sociological Association of Aotearoa New Zealand
Language eng
Abstract Set in the context of the recent controversy in New Zealand over the treatment of child cancer sufferer Liam Williams-Holloway, this article illustrates the role of health practitioners in the construction and reconfiguration of alternative and conventional medicine. Analysis of the discursive practices of alternative and conventional health practitioners demonstrates how they both strategically consolidate and contest so-called natural distinctions between alternative and conventional medicine to validate their professions. It is argued that science, certainty and holism are used discursively by both alternative and conventional practitioners to do boundary work. Their competing translations of what these actually constitute result in ongoing attempts to define science, certainty, and holism as practitioners attempt to protect their respective territories and contest the claims of others.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences - Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 07 Aug 2011, 11:57:39 EST by Rachel Smith on behalf of Faculty of Social & Behavioural Sciences