A descriptive analysis of maternal marital adjustment, father interaction and maternal aversive and child oppositional behaviours in families of conduct disordered and non problem children

Burton, Nicola (1988). A descriptive analysis of maternal marital adjustment, father interaction and maternal aversive and child oppositional behaviours in families of conduct disordered and non problem children Honours Thesis, , The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Burton, Nicola
Thesis Title A descriptive analysis of maternal marital adjustment, father interaction and maternal aversive and child oppositional behaviours in families of conduct disordered and non problem children
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 1988
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Total pages 89
Language eng
Subjects 11 Medical and Health Sciences
Formatted abstract The purpose of this study was to document group differences between families of conduct disordered children and non problem children, and between families categorized as having different levels of maternal marital adjustment with conduct disordered children. Measures included independent ratings of maternal aversive and child deviant behaviour, rates of father home and father interacting when home, and maternal perception of child deviance. The effect of father interaction on rates of maternal aversive and child oppositional behaviours was also investigated. A total of 24 families participated in the study. Results revealed no significant differences between the clinic families of different levels of maternal marital adjustment. Families with an oppositional child were characterized by higher rates of maternal aversive and child oppositional behaviours, and mothers were more likely to perceive their child's behaviour as deviant. Rates of father interaction did not significantly differ between any of the groups, and did not effect relative rates of material aversive and child oppositional behaviours. Control families evidenced lower ranks of child opposition independent of father interaction. With the father home but not interacting, families with oppositional children evidenced higher rates of problem children. to the measures maternal aversiveness than did families of non Results were interpreted with particular reference of maternal marital adjustment and father interaction.

Document type: Thesis
Collection: UQ Theses (non-RHD) - UQ staff and students only
 
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