Cardiorespiratory synchronization preceding sighs with and without post sigh central apnea in health and chronic neonatal lung disease

Nguyen, Chinh, Dakin, Carolyn, Yuill, Margaret and Wilson, Stephen J. (2011). Cardiorespiratory synchronization preceding sighs with and without post sigh central apnea in health and chronic neonatal lung disease. In: Meeting Abstracts: American Thoracic Society 2011 International Conference. 2011 American Thoracic Society International Conference, Denver, CO, USA, (A5326-A5326). 13-18 May 2011.

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Author Nguyen, Chinh
Dakin, Carolyn
Yuill, Margaret
Wilson, Stephen J.
Title of paper Cardiorespiratory synchronization preceding sighs with and without post sigh central apnea in health and chronic neonatal lung disease
Conference name 2011 American Thoracic Society International Conference
Conference location Denver, CO, USA
Conference dates 13-18 May 2011
Proceedings title Meeting Abstracts: American Thoracic Society 2011 International Conference   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher American Thoracic Society
Publication Year 2011
Sub-type Published abstract
ISSN 1073-449X
1535-4970
Volume 183
Issue Supp. 1
Start page A5326
End page A5326
Total pages 1
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Introduction: Sighs (deep inspirations) are thought to have an important role in restoring lung volume, resetting the mechanical properties of lung tissue and in resetting neurorespiratory control. In quiet or non-rapid eye movement sleep, sighs are often followed by post sigh central apnea. Sighs reduce in frequency with maturation over the first year of life. We speculate that cardiorespiratory synchronization (CRS), as a measure of neurorespiratory control, would differ between sigh with and without central apnea, and change with maturation. We also hypothesize that infants with chronic neonatal lung disease (CNLD) would display differences in CRS preceding sigh versus measurements derived from healthy infants.

Methodology: Full overnight polysomnography (PSG) data was obtained from prospective cohorts of 34 healthy infants (aged 2 weeks, 3 months and 6 months old) and of 82 CNLD infants (aged 3-6 months old). Both groups were studied in room air. CRS strength was assessed by a phase synchronization method measuring coupling between breathing and heart beat obtained from the R-wave. The synchronization index varies from 0 (unsynchronized) to 1 (perfectly synchronized).

Results:
Our results show a significant decrease of CRS prior to sigh followed by a post sigh central apnea (sigh-PSCA) compared to sigh alone in both healthy and CNLD infants. In the healthy infant group, CRS index was lower with sigh-PSCA (0.59, 0.68, 0.69) at 2 weeks, 3 months and 6 months of age, respectively) than with sigh alone (0.65, 0.72, 0.79, respectively). In the CNLD group, CRS index was also lower with sigh-PSCA (0.66) than with sigh alone (0.71). Using healthy infant’s data at 2 weeks old as reference, CRS increased at 3 months of age and further increased at 6 months of age. The greatest change was observed between 2 weeks and 3 months of age.

Conclusion:
CRS changes with infant maturation. Post sigh central apnea is associated with a significant decrease in CRS preceding the apneic event.
Q-Index Code CX
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published under C96. What's New in Pediatric Sleep?: Meeting Abstracts: American Thoracic Society 2011 International Conference

 
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Created: Tue, 02 Aug 2011, 15:39:05 EST by Mr Chinh Nguyen on behalf of Social Sciences and Humanities Library Service