Patients' and family members' views on how clinicians enact and how they should enact incident disclosure: the "100 patient stories" qualitative study

Iedema, Rick, Allen, Sueellen, Britton,Kate, Piper, Donella, Baker, Andrew, Grbich, Carol, Allan, Alfred, Jones, Liz, Tuckett, Anthony G., Williams, Allison, Manias, Elizabeth and Gallagher, Thomas H. (2011) Patients' and family members' views on how clinicians enact and how they should enact incident disclosure: the "100 patient stories" qualitative study. BMJ, 343 d4423.1-d4423.9. doi:10.1136/bmj.d4423


Author Iedema, Rick
Allen, Sueellen
Britton,Kate
Piper, Donella
Baker, Andrew
Grbich, Carol
Allan, Alfred
Jones, Liz
Tuckett, Anthony G.
Williams, Allison
Manias, Elizabeth
Gallagher, Thomas H.
Title Patients' and family members' views on how clinicians enact and how they should enact incident disclosure: the "100 patient stories" qualitative study
Journal name BMJ
ISSN 0959-535X
1468-5833
1756-1833
Publication date 2011-07-25
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1136/bmj.d4423
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 343
Start page d4423.1
End page d4423.9
Total pages 9
Place of publication London, U.K.
Publisher BMJ Group
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objectives  To investigate patients’ and family members’ perceptions and experiences of disclosure of healthcare incidents and to derive principles of effective disclosure.

Design  Retrospective qualitative study based on 100 semi-structured, in depth interviews with patients and family members.

Setting  Nationwide multisite survey across Australia.

Participants  39 patients and 80 family members who were involved in high severity healthcare incidents (leading to death, permanent disability, or long term harm) and incident disclosure. Recruitment was via national newspapers (43%), health services where the incidents occurred (28%), two internet marketing companies (27%), and consumer organisations (2%).

Main outcome measures  Participants’ recurrent experiences and concerns expressed in interviews.

Results  Most patients and family members felt that the health service incident disclosure rarely met their needs and expectations. They expected better preparation for incident disclosure, more shared dialogue about what went wrong, more follow-up support, input into when the time was ripe for closure, and more information about subsequent improvement in process. This analysis provided the basis for the formulation of a set of principles of effective incident disclosure.

Conclusions  Despite growing prominence of open disclosure, discussion about healthcare incidents still falls short of patient and family member expectations. Healthcare organisations and providers should strengthen their efforts to meet patients’ (and family members’) needs and expectations.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 26 Jul 2011, 13:16:10 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work