Correlates of physical activity in men and women with osteoarthritis: Findings from Australia

Heesch, Kristiann C., Ng, Norman and Brown, Wendy J. (2009). Correlates of physical activity in men and women with osteoarthritis: Findings from Australia. In: ACSM Annual Meeting 2009, Seattle, USA, (437-437). 27-30 May 2009. doi:10.1249/01.MSS.0000355880.98528.53


Author Heesch, Kristiann C.
Ng, Norman
Brown, Wendy J.
Title of paper Correlates of physical activity in men and women with osteoarthritis: Findings from Australia
Conference name ACSM Annual Meeting 2009
Conference location Seattle, USA
Conference dates 27-30 May 2009
Journal name Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise   Check publisher's open access policy
Publisher Lippincott William & Wilkins
Publication Year 2009
DOI 10.1249/01.MSS.0000355880.98528.53
ISSN 0195-9131
Volume 41
Issue 5 Supplement 1
Start page 437
End page 437
Total pages 1
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Osteoarthritis (OA) is the leading cause of pain and disability in Australia, and physical activity is a preferred treatment for OA symptoms. However, most people with OA are not engaging in health-enhancing activities recommended to relieve symptoms. Understanding the modifiable factors associated with these activities is necessary to encourage participation. PURPOSE: To examine the correlates of leisure-time physical activity (LTPA), strength training, and stretching exercises among individuals with OA. METHODS: As part of a mail survey, 485 individuals, aged 68.0 (SD=10.6) years, with hip or knee OA were asked about current use of 17 therapies for OA relief as well as about demographic, health-related and psychological factors. Associations with each activity outcome were examined in a multivariable logistic regression model, separately for men and women. RESULTS: Having the use of a walking aid was associated with LTPA in men and women (p<0.05). In men, attempting to lose weight and using massage therapy were associated with participation in both strength training and stretching exercises (p<0.05). In women, attempting to lose weight and taking an OA self-management program were associated with participation in strength training (p<0.05), and taking an OA self-management program, using orthotics in shoes, and the perceived benefits of physical activities were associated with stretching exercises (p<0.05). CONCLUSION: This is the first study to show that use of certain OA therapies is associated with participation in physical activities. Acknowledging the limitations of the cross-sectional design, the findings indicate important channels, such as OA self-management programs for women and massage therapists for men, for promoting activity. They also indicate the perceived need for aids, like walking aids and orthotics, for participation in health-enhancing activities.
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 12 Jul 2011, 11:51:33 EST by Christopher O'Keefe on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences