Measuring the social value of heritage: A framework based on the evaluation of sustainable development

Landorf, Chris (2011). Measuring the social value of heritage: A framework based on the evaluation of sustainable development. In: Antony Moulis and Deborah van der Plaat, Audience: The 28th Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) Annual Conference. Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) Annual Conference, Brisbane, QLD, Australia, (1-18). 7-10 July 2011.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Landorf, Chris
Title of paper Measuring the social value of heritage: A framework based on the evaluation of sustainable development
Conference name Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) Annual Conference
Conference location Brisbane, QLD, Australia
Conference dates 7-10 July 2011
Convener Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ)
Proceedings title Audience: The 28th Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) Annual Conference
Place of Publication Brisbane, QLD, Australia
Publisher Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ)
Publication Year 2011
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status
ISBN 9780646558264
0646558269
Editor Antony Moulis
Deborah van der Plaat
Start page 1
End page 18
Total pages 18
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Debates about the potential of historic environments to contribute to sustainable development have to date focused principally on measurable economic and environmental benefits. While equally as important, arguments for the social role of heritage in sustainable development have been based largely on assumption and conjecture. Issues critical to social sustainability, such as equity, identity and participation, are difficult to quantify. As a result, the more tangible heritage values are emphasised in standard economic cost-benefit approaches. This paper starts with a brief exploration of the concept of collective memory and the role it plays in giving industrial heritage social value. The paper then reviews the use of memory, identity and heritage in the policy surrounding sustainable development and social inclusion in former industrial areas. With this understanding, the paper examines approaches to the measurement of social value outlined in the 2006 Australian Productivity Commission Inquiry Report Conservation of Australia’s Historic Heritage Places. Using Broken Hill as a case study, the paper sets out to establish a framework for evaluating heritage as a core element of social sustainability.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Presented during Session 5A: "Adaptive re-use as architectural history" under the title "Measuring the social value of adaptive re-use". Published in full on the Proceedings CD-ROM enclosed with the Proceedings. Abstract published on p10.

 
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Created: Mon, 11 Jul 2011, 14:51:12 EST by Dr Chris Landorf on behalf of School of Architecture