Punishment as restoration of group and offender values following a transgression: Value consensus through symbolic labelling and offender reform

Okimoto, Tyler G. and Wenzel, Michael (2009) Punishment as restoration of group and offender values following a transgression: Value consensus through symbolic labelling and offender reform. European Journal of Social Psychology, 39 3: 346-367. doi:10.1002/ejsp.537


Author Okimoto, Tyler G.
Wenzel, Michael
Title Punishment as restoration of group and offender values following a transgression: Value consensus through symbolic labelling and offender reform
Journal name European Journal of Social Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0046-2772
1099-0992
Publication date 2009-04
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/ejsp.537
Volume 39
Issue 3
Start page 346
End page 367
Total pages 22
Place of publication Bognor Regis, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Language eng
Abstract Justice theory has suggested that transgressions pose a threat to the shared values that underlie broken rules or laws, suggesting that in order to address concerns over the values violated by an offence, perceived consensus regarding those values must be reaffirmed. However, little empirical research has been conducted examining how legal responses can address those value concerns. In the current research we argue that punishments, as a common response to injustice, can reaffirm perceived value consensus through two routes: (1) by symbolically labelling the offence as against group values, thus reinforcing values towards observers and (2) by attempting to reform the offender, thus reinforcing values towards the offender. Consistent with this argument, three empirical studies showed that the public and inclusive nature of punishment helps restore a perceived value consensus as such characteristics facilitate these two processes. Moreover, these characteristics had a positive effect on perceived punishment appropriateness particularly when value concerns were heightened. These findings implicate symbolic labelling and offender reform as two processes by which punishments can restore the perception of value consensus and suggest that these processes are integral to justice restoration through punishment when value consensus is a dominant concern.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 1 JUN 2008

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: UQ Business School Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 11 Jul 2011, 12:27:02 EST by Karen Morgan on behalf of UQ Business School