High prevalence of helicobacter-pylori antibodies in an institutionalized population: Evidence for person-to-person transmission

Lambert, J.R., Lin, S.K., Sievert, W., Nicholson, L., Schembri, M. and Guest, C. (1995) High prevalence of helicobacter-pylori antibodies in an institutionalized population: Evidence for person-to-person transmission. American Journal of Gastroenterology, 90 12: 2167-2171.

Author Lambert, J.R.
Lin, S.K.
Sievert, W.
Nicholson, L.
Schembri, M.
Guest, C.
Title High prevalence of helicobacter-pylori antibodies in an institutionalized population: Evidence for person-to-person transmission
Journal name American Journal of Gastroenterology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0002-9270
1572-0241
Publication date 1995-12
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 90
Issue 12
Start page 2167
End page 2171
Total pages 5
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective:
To evaluate the prevalence of H. pylori antibodies in mentally and physically handicapped adults living together in a long-term care facility.

Methods:
One hundred twenty-two institutionalized subjects from six living areas were compared to a normal representative Caucasian population obtained by random sampling from the urban population area of Melbourne. Serum samples from 1977 and 1989 from 122 subjects were tested for H. pylori antibody by an ELISA technique. The data were analyzed by Student's t test, χ2 test and logistic regression.

Results:
Ninety-two of the 122 subjects (75%) from whom sera was collected in 1989 were seropositive for H. pylori, compared with only 23% in age- and sex-matched control subjects (p < 0.0001). The prevalence of H. pylori antibodies in 1977 was 34% (42/122). Of the remaining 80 seronegative subjects, 51 (61.4%) converted to became positive in the 12-yr interval. The annual seroconversion rate was 7.4%, with an average of 4.25 newly positive subjects each year. The prevalence of H. pylori in 1989 was significantly higher than in 1977 after adjustment for age (odds ratio 2.39, 95% CI 1.1-5.3, p = 0.03).

Conclusions:

H. pylori antibodies are significantly more prevalent in institutionalized adults compared with controls from the general population. These data support the hypothesis that H. pylori is acquired by either fecal-oral or oral-oral transmission.
Keyword Campylobacter-Pylori
Human Feces
Infection
Seroepidemiology
Identification
Specimens
Pcr
Dna
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
 
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