Back to the future: Is strategic management (re)emerging as public relations' dominant paradigm?

McDonald, Lynette M. and Hebbani, Aparna G. (2011) Back to the future: Is strategic management (re)emerging as public relations' dominant paradigm?. PRism, 8 1: 1-16.

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Author McDonald, Lynette M.
Hebbani, Aparna G.
Title Back to the future: Is strategic management (re)emerging as public relations' dominant paradigm?
Journal name PRism
ISSN 1448-4404
Publication date 2011-07
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 8
Issue 1
Start page 1
End page 16
Total pages 16
Editor Elspeth Tilley
Place of publication Robina, Qld., Australia
Publisher Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Bond University
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Most public relations practitioners and scholars agree that public relations’ functions include communication, stakeholder relationship management, reputation management, and strategic management. The purpose of this position paper is to continue the discussion on the current and future directions of the public relations discipline, which impacts both the practice and education of public relations. We start with a brief overview of the history of public relations and investigate the four functions of public relations (which have been suggested as paradigms) via an examination of seven studies on public relations practitioner roles in Europe, Australia, New Zealand and Ireland. After examining these studies, we suggest that there seems to be an increasing practitioner focus in Europe and Australia on public relations’ strategic management function, which marks a return to public relations’ earlier, more solid foundations. We contend that the professionalisation of the public relations industry is assisting its return to a more strategic area of practice.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Communication and Arts Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 30 Jun 2011, 15:52:38 EST by Dr Aparna Hebbani on behalf of School of Journalism and Communication