Terror, reason, and history

Hunter, Ian (2011) Terror, reason, and history. Alternatives: Global, Local, Political, 36 1: 56-63. doi:10.1177/0304375411402018

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Author Hunter, Ian
Title Terror, reason, and history
Journal name Alternatives: Global, Local, Political   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0304-3754
Publication date 2011-02
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/0304375411402018
Open Access Status
Volume 36
Issue 1
Start page 56
End page 63
Total pages 8
Place of publication Thousand Oaks, CA, United States
Publisher Sage Publications
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Abstract A striking feature of Barry Hindess' political thought is its unflinching application of theoretical reason to concrete problems. In recent discussion of terrorism, Hindess thus argues against the restricted application of the term to nonstate actors and for its expansion to cover the political violence of territorial states. This self-consciously polemical argument displays Hindess' commitment to theoretical reason and his preparedness to assess historical politics on this exacting basis. In this article, I argue for a more “timid” form of political analysis, that gives more room to compromised historical–political norms, and that has greater sympathy for the restricted application of the notion of terrorism.
Keyword Terrorism
Theory
History
State
sovereignty
Hobbes
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
Centre for the History of European Discourses Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 28 Jun 2011, 16:01:48 EST by Professor Ian Hunter on behalf of Centre for History of European Discourses