The management of cutaneous malignancy with large nerve perineural spread

Panizza, B. (2009). The management of cutaneous malignancy with large nerve perineural spread. In: Annual Scientific Meeting, Australasian College of Dermatologists, Gold Coast, Australia, (A5-A5). 17-20 May 2009. doi:10.1111/j.1440-0960.2009.00524.x


Author Panizza, B.
Title of paper The management of cutaneous malignancy with large nerve perineural spread
Conference name Annual Scientific Meeting, Australasian College of Dermatologists
Conference location Gold Coast, Australia
Conference dates 17-20 May 2009
Journal name Australasian Journal of Dermatology   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Publication Year 2009
Sub-type Published abstract
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-0960.2009.00524.x
ISSN 0004-8380
1440-0960
Volume 50
Issue Suppl. 1
Start page A5
End page A5
Total pages 1
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Large nerve perineural spread represents a rare but potentially fatal form of metastasis for cutaneous malignancy most prevalent in the head and neck region. This often misunderstood and misdiagnosed condition is particularly prevalent in Queensland and is most commonly seen with squamous cell carcinomas. It is not known whether small nerve (incidental) and large nerve (clinical) represent a spectrum of the same disease processes but it is clear that the two have much different prognostic significance. An overview of large nerve disease will be discussed including which nerves are commonly affected and patterns of failure. Finally, current management regimes will be covered including staging of the disease and specific skull base techniques used for varying nerve involvement.
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 27 Jun 2011, 08:02:35 EST by Dr Benedict Panizza on behalf of Surgery - Princess Alexandra Hospital