Human immunodeficiency virus associated tuberculosis more often due to recent infection than reactivation of latent infection

Houben, R.M.G.J., Crampin, A.C., Ndhlovu, R., Sonnenberg, P., Godfrey-Faussett, P., Haas, W.H., Engelmann, G., Lombard, C.J., Wilkinson, D., Bruchfeld, J., Lockman, S., Tappero, J. and Glynn, J.R. (2011) Human immunodeficiency virus associated tuberculosis more often due to recent infection than reactivation of latent infection. International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 15 1: 24-31.

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
UQ242923_fulltext.pdf Full text from publisher application/pdf 717.50KB 1
Author Houben, R.M.G.J.
Crampin, A.C.
Ndhlovu, R.
Sonnenberg, P.
Godfrey-Faussett, P.
Haas, W.H.
Engelmann, G.
Lombard, C.J.
Wilkinson, D.
Bruchfeld, J.
Lockman, S.
Tappero, J.
Glynn, J.R.
Title Human immunodeficiency virus associated tuberculosis more often due to recent infection than reactivation of latent infection
Journal name International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1027-3719
Publication date 2011-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 15
Issue 1
Start page 24
End page 31
Total pages 8
Place of publication Saint-Michel Paris, France
Publisher International Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
BACKGROUND: It is unclear whether human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) increases the risk of tuberculosis (TB) mainly through reactivation or following recent Mycobacterium tuberculosis (re)infection. Within a DNA fingerprint-defined cluster of TB cases, reactivation cases are assumed to be the source of infection for subsequent secondary cases. As HIV-positive TB cases are less likely to be source cases, equal or higher clustering in HIV-positives would suggest that HIV mainly increases the risk of TB following recent infection.

METHODS: A systematic review was conducted to identify all studies on TB clustering and HIV infection in HIV-endemic populations. Available individual patient data from eligible studies were pooled to analyse the association between clustering and HIV.

RESULTS: Of seven eligible studies, six contributed individual patient data on 2116 patients. Clustering was as, or more, likely in the HIV-positive population, both overall (summary OR 1.26, 95%CI 1.0-1.5), and within age groups (OR 1.50, 95%CI 0.9-2.3; OR 1.00, 95%CI 0.8-1.3 and OR 2.57, 95%CI 1.4-5.7) for ages 15-25, 26-50 and >50 years, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that HIV infection mainly increases the risk of TB following recent M. tuberculosis transmission, and that TB control measures in HIV-endemic settings should therefore focus on controlling M. tuberculosis transmission rather than treating individuals with latent M. tuberculosis infection.

© 2011 Publishing Technology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 22 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Fri, 24 Jun 2011, 10:52:02 EST by Matthew Lamb on behalf of School of Medicine