The story of indigenous Australians : the role of categorisation shifts in inter-group conflict resolution and collective action for social change

Quinn, Emerald. (2006). The story of indigenous Australians : the role of categorisation shifts in inter-group conflict resolution and collective action for social change Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, University of Queensland.

       
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Author Quinn, Emerald.
Thesis Title The story of indigenous Australians : the role of categorisation shifts in inter-group conflict resolution and collective action for social change
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution University of Queensland
Publication date 2006
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Dr. Winifred Louis
Total pages 66
Language eng
Subjects 379902 Aboriginal Studies
Formatted abstract This thesis explores the role of categorisation shifts in inter-group conflict resolution and collective action for social change from the previously un-investigated perspective of Indigenous Australians. Specifically, the study tested the hypothesis that framing the Stolen Generations at the inclusive human level (i.e., humans behaving badly to other humans) would result in more positive responses to contemporary White Australians compared to framing the Stolen Generations at the inter-group level (i.e., White/European Australians behaving badly to Indigenous Australians). It was also expected that increasing category inclusiveness, from the inter-group level to the all-inclusive human level, would weaken ethnic group identification, and in turn, the motivation for involvement in collective action for social change. Overall, consistent with hypotheses, the development of a common human identity led to increased forgiveness of contemporary White Australians for atrocities committed in the past and decreased ethnic group identification and willingness to engage in collective action for social change. The argument is made that psychological re-categorisation at a higher level of inclusiveness, while generally improving interracial evaluations, may simultaneously undermine collective action for social change and thereby inadvertently contribute to the maintenance of a disadvantaged group's position within society.

Keyword Aboriginal Australians -- Social conditions
Conflict management -- Australia
Social change -- Australia

Document type: Thesis
Collection: UQ Theses (non-RHD) - UQ staff and students only
 
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