Academic doping or Viagra for the brain? The history of recreational drug use and pharmacological enhancement can provide insight into these uses of neuropharmaceuticals

Lucke, JC, Bell, SK, Partridge, BJ and Hall, WD (2011) Academic doping or Viagra for the brain? The history of recreational drug use and pharmacological enhancement can provide insight into these uses of neuropharmaceuticals. EMBO Reports, 12 3: 197-201. doi:10.1038/embor.2011.15


Author Lucke, JC
Bell, SK
Partridge, BJ
Hall, WD
Title Academic doping or Viagra for the brain? The history of recreational drug use and pharmacological enhancement can provide insight into these uses of neuropharmaceuticals
Journal name EMBO Reports   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1469-221X
1469-3178
Publication date 2011-03
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1038/embor.2011.15
Volume 12
Issue 3
Start page 197
End page 201
Total pages 5
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Abstract Recent developments in neuroscience have raised the possibility that neuropharmaceuticals and other interventions could be used to enhance brain processes in ‘normal’ people who are not impaired by mental illness or disorder. The terms ‘cognitive enhancement’ and ‘neuroenhancement’ are often used interchangeably to describe this type of drug use—which is similar to doping in sports—that is not for treating impairments of clinical significance or for recreation.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Official 2012 Collection
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 14 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 18 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Thu, 23 Jun 2011, 10:54:04 EST by Dr Brad Partridge on behalf of UQ Centre for Clinical Research