Cerebral malaria in children

Steele, R. W. and Baffoebonnie, B. (1995) Cerebral malaria in children. Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, 14 4: 281-285. doi:10.1097/00006454-199504000-00007


Author Steele, R. W.
Baffoebonnie, B.
Title Cerebral malaria in children
Journal name Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0891-3668
1532-0987
Publication date 1995-04
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1097/00006454-199504000-00007
Volume 14
Issue 4
Start page 281
End page 285
Total pages 5
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Language eng
Abstract A retrospective chart review for the 1993 calendar year identified 187 children with cerebral malaria admitted to a large teaching hospital in central Ghana, West Africa. The most common clinical presentation was fever, sensorial depression and convulsions in young children experiencing their first episode of malaria. One-half had splenomegaly. Additional features, seen in decreasing frequency, were hepatomegaly, vomiting, abdominal pain and headache. Long term sequelae were identified in 9% and mortality in 6%. Risk factors for central nervous system disease were negative history for previous malaria (P < 0.005) and a high percentage of parasitemia (P < 0.001). Death or long term sequelae were associated with multiple seizures and prolonged sensorial depression. The incidence of malaria is currently increasing in Western Africa and young children are more likely than older children to develop severe disease.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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