Social and genetic interactions drive fitness variation in a free-living dolphin population

Frere, Celine H., Krutzen, Michael, Mann, Janet, Connor, Richard C., Bejder, Lars and Sherwin, William B. (2010) Social and genetic interactions drive fitness variation in a free-living dolphin population. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of USA, 107 46: 19949-19954. doi:10.1073/pnas.1007997107

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Author Frere, Celine H.
Krutzen, Michael
Mann, Janet
Connor, Richard C.
Bejder, Lars
Sherwin, William B.
Title Social and genetic interactions drive fitness variation in a free-living dolphin population
Journal name Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of USA   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0027-8424
1091-6490
Publication date 2010-11-16
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1007997107
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 107
Issue 46
Start page 19949
End page 19954
Total pages 6
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher National Academy of Sciences
Language eng
Abstract The evolutionary forces that drive fitness variation in species are of considerable interest. Despite this, the relative importance and interactions of genetic and social factors involved in the evolution of fitness traits in wild mammalian populations are largely unknown. To date, a few studies have demonstrated that fitness might be influenced by either social factors or genes in natural populations, but none have explored how the combined effect of social and genetic parameters might interact to influence fitness. Drawing from a long-term study of wild bottlenose dolphins in the eastern gulf of Shark Bay, Western Australia, we present a unique approach to understanding these interactions. Our study shows that female calving success depends on both genetic inheritance and social bonds. Moreover, we demonstrate that interactions between social and genetic factors also influence female fitness. Therefore, our study represents a major methodological advance, and provides critical insights into the interplay of genetic and social parameters of fitness.
Keyword Animal model
Gene-culture coevolution
Relatedness
Reproductive success
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 64 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Tue, 14 Jun 2011, 10:34:17 EST by Ms Celine Frere on behalf of School of Agriculture and Food Sciences